Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Theory from the hills
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
2019 (English)In: The Highlander: Journal of Highland Asia, E-ISSN 2632-0541, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 26-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Highlander suggests that geography, and especially, altitude matters. And indeed things look different depending on where you stand. Climb a mountain and the perspective changes as does the landscape itself; the flora, fauna, smells, the air and much more change. High altitude gives a sense of clarity, you can see further out in the distance, things otherwise hidden reveal itself and patterns, traces, paths emerge. It is perhaps no surprise that mountains are places of introspection and spiritual quests. Yet again how altitude matters in a more precise manner in the workings of society is harder to tell. James C. Scott famously argues that hills are difficult to govern and therefore allow for more egalitarian, democratic and non-state types of polities to flourish (2009). His take on “Zomia”, originally proposed by Willem van Schendel, has encouraged scholars to think regions, and geography more generally, outside the dominant framework of nation-states. For Scott, the hills carry a political vision of an anarchist or acephalous society. Indeed, we need to be reminded that another world is possible. Zomia is a powerful image for this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh, 2019. Vol. 1, no 1, p. 26-30
Keywords [en]
theorizing, hills, Northeast india
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-199703DOI: 10.2218/thj.v1.2019.4187OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-199703DiVA, id: diva2:1619547
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Theory from the hills(393 kB)187 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 393 kBChecksum SHA-512
694e9bee4d56068bb648fbb214b97f955d0d65343c8fa2cf72f971223981c99767de8dc2e37bd35538d21f4d8f19458fda45b534335ad736cadb9f7fdd69284c
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records

Karlsson, Bengt G.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Karlsson, Bengt G.
By organisation
Department of Social Anthropology
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 187 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf