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Walking on the wild side: On cultural diversity and the Pitted Ware Culture along the Swedish east coast during the Middle Neolithic
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
2007 (English)In: From Stonehenge to the Baltic: Living with cultural diversity in the third millennium BC, Archaeopress, Oxford , 2007, 1-11 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

There was a rich diversity in material culture during the Middle Neolithic in Scandinavia and the Baltic region, and the archaeological remains have therefore generally been labelled as one out of several parallel archaeological cultures. What these “cultures” represent, and whether or not they correspond to actual groups of people has long been debated. Particularly the Pitted Ware Culture has given rise to various hypotheses. By applying stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses on human and faunal skeletal remains from Pitted Ware contexts, and to compare these data with stable isotope data derived from sites of other cultural attribution, we were able to demonstrate that the Pitted Ware Culture in fact represents a separate group of people, not only distinguished by their characteristic pottery, but also by their food culture, which was mainly based on the utilization of seal. On the basis of stable isotope, radiocarbon and archaeological data, various other hypotheses regarding the Pitted Ware Culture and its stance vis-à-vis the Funnel Beaker and Battle Axe (Corded Ware) Cultures could thus be refuted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Archaeopress, Oxford , 2007. 1-11 p.
Keyword [en]
archaeology, Neolithic, Sweden, Pitted Ware Culture, cultural identity, diet, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, hunter-gatherer
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeological Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-10472ISBN: 9781407301303 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-10472DiVA: diva2:176991
Available from: 2008-01-02 Created: 2008-01-02 Last updated: 2009-12-03Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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