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Relationship between Self-Ratings of Recovery and Morning Salivary Cortisol
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Arbets- och organisationspsykologi.
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Biologisk psykologi.
2007 (English)In: The XIII th European Congress of Work and Organizational Psychology, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The understanding of how self-ratings of work-related rest and recovery relate to cortisol output is poor. This study aimed to investigate the associations between self-ratings of 15 items of rest and recovery and salivary cortisol measured every second hour during two work days. Data came from 12 female and 13male white-collar workers and were analyzed by linear regression analyses and repeated measures ANOVA. The results showed that poor rest and recovery was associated with high levels of morning cortisol. The strongest relationships between single items and salivary cortisol emerged for ”rested in the morning”,

”rested after a weekend”, ”feel energetic during the working day”, ”tired during the working day”, ”sufficient sleep” and ”worry about something”. Furthermore, significant interaction effects were found between sex and “rested after a weekend” and “worry about something”. To conclude, the findings show linkages between self-ratings of rest and recovery and cortisol levels, particularly morning cortisol. This suggests that self-ratings of rest and recovery provide important information on physiological recovery in terms of cortisol output.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-10563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-10563DiVA: diva2:177082
Available from: 2008-01-16 Created: 2008-01-16Bibliographically approved

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