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Still no increase in alcohol consumption? A follow-up of the unexpected results of a tax change and increased availability
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
2007 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Background On October 1st 2003 Denmark dropped its spirits tax by 45%, and on January 1st 2004 Sweden increased the traveller’s allowances. These two major changes were expected to increase alcohol purchases from Denmark by Swedes in the southern parts of Sweden. Aims The aim of the paper was to examine to what extent the policy changes were associated with changes in alcohol consumption in southern Sweden, for the total sample and in different population groups. Design, setting and participants Data were collected through telephone interviews from the southern parts of Sweden during the third quarter 2003-2006 (N’s 972-1425). The north of Sweden served as a control site, using the same method as in the experimental site (N’s 994-1343). Additional longitudinal samples were collected (NS=697, NN=670). Measurements Alcohol consumption was measured with beverage specific QF-scale questions. Separate analyses for monthly bingers and risk consumers were also performed. Findings Alcohol consumption did not increase more in the southern parts compared to the northern parts, but rather decreased while consumption increased in the north. Some population groups were however also found to have increased the consumption in the South, like women especially the older ones and those highly educated. Results indicated also that increase might have occurred among risk-consumers both among men and women and all age groups. Conclusions The study did not support earlier studies stating that decreased prices and increased availability leads to higher alcohol consumption, but neither could the possibility that the changes had an impact on some subgroups be eliminated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007.
Keyword [en]
Alcohol consumption, tax change, traveller allowances quotas, cross-sectional data, quasi-panel data, sub groups
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-11032OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-11032DiVA: diva2:177551
Conference
the 33rd Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society for Social and Epidemiological Research on Alcohol
Projects
Nordic Alcohol Tax Study
Note

Paper presented at the 33rd Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society for Social and Epidemiological Research on Alcohol, Budapest, Hungary, 4-8 June, 2007

Available from: 2008-01-09 Created: 2008-01-09 Last updated: 2016-03-28

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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