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Sleep, sleepiness and health complaints in police officers: the effects of a flexible shift system.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
2007 (English)In: Ind Health, ISSN 0019-8366, Vol. 45, no 2, 279-88 p.Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Sleep, sleepiness and health complaints in police officers: the effects of a flexible shift system.

Eriksen CA, Kecklund G.

National Institute for Psychosocial Medicine (IPM), Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

The aim of the study was to study the effects of a flexible shift system (based on self-determined work hours) with respect to sleep/wake complaints and subjective health. The comparison group was a rapidly rotating shift system, with frequently occurring quick returns. A secondary aim was to examine the relation between work hour characteristics indicating compressed or difficult rosters (e.g. number of workdays in a row, frequency of quick returns and long work shifts) and subjective sleep and sleepiness, within the flexible shift system group. The sample of the analysis included 533 randomly selected police officers, of which 26% were females. The participants answered a questionnaire. The results showed that the flexible shift system group did not differ with respect to sleep/wake complaints and subjective health. However, the flexible shift group obtained more sleep in connection with the shifts, probably because of longer rest time between shifts. Thus, they worked less quick returns and long work shifts. The association between work hour characteristics and sleep/wake complaints was weak in the flexible shift group. Instead, sleep/wake problems were mainly associated with the attitude to work hours.

PMID: 17485872 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 45, no 2, 279-88 p.
Keyword [en]
Adult, Analysis of Variance, Attitude, Case-Control Studies, Choice Behavior, Fatigue/etiology/*psychology, Female, Humans, Job Satisfaction, Male, Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*classification, Police/*statistics & numerical data, Questionnaires, Regression Analysis, Sleep/physiology, Sleep Disorders; Circadian Rhythm/*epidemiology/prevention & control/psychology, Stress; Psychological/*epidemiology, Sweden, Time and Motion Studies, Work Schedule Tolerance/*psychology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-11431PubMedID: 17485872OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-11431DiVA: diva2:177950
Note
P2638Available from: 2008-01-11 Created: 2008-01-11 Last updated: 2011-01-11Bibliographically approved

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