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Mental health of recently resettled refugees from the Middle East in Sweden: the impact of pre-resettlement trauma, resettlement stress and capacity to handle stress.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
2008 (English)In: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol, ISSN 0933-7954, Vol. 43, no 2, 121-31 p.Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental health of recently resettled refugees from the Middle East in Sweden: the impact of pre-resettlement trauma, resettlement stress and capacity to handle stress.

Lindencrona F, Ekblad S, Hauff E.

Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry-HS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, c/o Stress Research Institute, 10691, Stockholm, Sweden, fredrik.lindencrona@ki.se.

The pathways to symptoms of common mental disorder and post-traumatic stress symptoms among refugees during resettlement need to be better specified. We aim to identify models of these different mental health outcomes among refugees during resettlement, taking pre-migration, migration and post-migration stress conditions, a person's capacity to handle such stress and socio-demographic variables into consideration. A new questionnaire developed to better cover resettlement stress, as well as pre-resettlement trauma exposures and different measures of a person's capacity to handle stress, was administered to 124 Middle Eastern refugees that had been granted permanent residency in Sweden only a few months before responding. We found four dimensions of resettlement stress: social and economic strain, alienation, discrimination and status loss and violence and threats in Sweden, that account for 62% of the total variance in resettlement stress. Social and economic strain and alienation are important for explaining symptoms of common mental disorder. In the model of core post-traumatic stress symptoms, pre-resettlement trauma exposure seems to have the strongest impact. A person's capacity to handle stress plays significant, direct and mediating roles in both models. The impact of resettlement stressors in the context of the whole migration process for different mental health outcomes is discussed.

PMID: 18060523 [PubMed - in process]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 43, no 2, 121-31 p.
Keyword [en]
Refugees, Resettlement stress, Pre-resettlement trauma, capacity to handle stress, Common mental disorder, Post-traumatic stress
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-12782ISI: 000252641700005PubMedID: 18060523OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-12782DiVA: diva2:179302
Note
P2640Available from: 2008-02-04 Created: 2008-02-04 Last updated: 2011-01-10Bibliographically approved

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