Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Social class and cause of death
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
2008 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 473-478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies have shown that causes of death differ in their relationship to social class, but we lack a more comprehensive description of this variation. The present study provides a detailed and extensive list of social class differences for a large number of specific causes of death.

Methods: All deaths between 1991 and 2003 in Sweden were linked with information on household social class from 1990. Relative death risks and excess mortality in groups of causes according to the European shortlist were estimated separately for men and women in eight classes using Cox Regression.

Results: A clear mortality gradient among employees was found for the majority of causes, from low-relative death risks among higher managerial and professional occupations to relatively high risks for the unskilled working class. There is considerable variation in the strength of the association, from causes such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer and transport accidents among women, where no clear class differences were found. At the other extreme, mental and behavioural disorders, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases and diseases of the respiratory system all show steep slopes for both men and women. Circulatory diseases and cancer together account for 15–20% of excess mortality.

Conclusions: Exceptions to the general pattern—causes of death in which higher social classes are exposed to greater death risks or in which there is no mortality gradient—are practically non-existent. There is nevertheless significant variation in the strength of the class differences in specific causes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 18, no 5, p. 473-478
Keywords [en]
cause of death, excess mortality, mortality, social class, socio-economic differences
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-14423DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckn053ISI: 000259583400010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-14423DiVA, id: diva2:180943
Available from: 2008-09-22 Created: 2008-09-22 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Erikson, RobertTorssander, Jenny
By organisation
The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI)
In the same journal
European Journal of Public Health
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 32 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf