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Should I Stay or Should I Go?: Does Employability Alter the Exit, Voice, Loyalty and Neglect Reactions to Job Insecurity?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2008 (English)In: Small Group Meeting, Leuven, Belgium, September 17-19, 2008., 2008Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Exit, voice, loyalty, and neglect as employee responses to companies in decline have been investigated in several studies. When individuals work and act in an environment that is turbulent with organizational changes, volatile working conditions and job insecurity, they may respond to these environmental circumstances either by leaving the organization (exit), by staying and actively affect the situation (voice), by staying and be loyal to management’s decisions (loyalty) or by staying and being passive (neglect). With respect to the individualization of the labour market, it cannot be expected that people react in similar ways to organizational events. Rather, it has been suggested that employability may have a moderating effect on the responses of for example job insecurity. Consequently, the aim of the present study is to investigate if employability moderates the effects of job insecurity on the outcomes of the framework of exit, voice, loyalty, and neglect. Data (questionnaires) was gathered in four different companies (administrative staff of a manufacturing company, one accounting firm, administrative section of a community, teachers of a community), comprising 725 white-collar workers. The data of the present study was analysed by means of hierarchical regression analyses, one for each of the four outcome variables. The results indicate that individuals who are high in employability may have greater opportunities for gaining control over their working life. Job insecurity was found to be associated with increased exit as well as with decreased voice and loyalty, although these effects were stronger among individuals who perceived themselves to be employable. Thus, people that perceived high levels of employability, as opposed to those who perceived lower levels of employability, under the circumstance of high job insecurity also reported stronger exit intentions together with weaker tendencies to use their voice and be loyal to their company. No association was found between neglect and job insecurity or employability. In conclusion, instead of making employees more likely to use voice in times of uncertainty, employability appears to primarily induce vocational mobility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008.
Keyword [en]
employability, job insecurity, loyalty
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-14768OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-14768DiVA, id: diva2:181288
Available from: 2008-10-30 Created: 2008-10-30Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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