Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Settling blooms of filamentous cyanobacteria as food for meiofauna assemblages.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
2008 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 53, no 6, 2636-2643 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Summer blooms of filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea are normally dominated by Aphanizomenon sp. and the toxin-producing Nodularia spumigena. In a 2-week laboratory experiment, we followed the uptake by representative benthic meiofauna species of C-14-labeled organic carbon from blooms, each dominated by one of these cyanobacteria. Natural bloom material was collected and labeled by incubation with (NaHCO3)-C-14. Uptake of cyanobacterial carbon was recorded for the major meiofauna taxa living in the first-centimeter layer, namely ostracods, harpacticoids, and nematodes. The uptake rates were within the range found for diatoms in other studies, indicating that cyanobacteria may be an important food resource for the meiobenthos. The uptake of cyanobacterial carbon varied significantly among species, even within the same class. The ostracod Candona neglecta showed the highest uptake values, whereas two other ostracod species took up very little of the label. There was no significant difference in utilization of carbon from Aphanizomenon sp. and N. spumigena and no reduction in the abundance of the meiofaunal taxa analyzed compared to unexposed controls, indicating that Baltic meiofaunal assemblages in general experience no mortality when exposed to settled cyanobacteria, even the hepatotoxic N. spumigena.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 53, no 6, 2636-2643 p.
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-15617ISI: 000261355500025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-15617DiVA: diva2:182137
Available from: 2008-12-07 Created: 2008-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Trophic ecology of meiofauna: Response to sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms in the Baltic Sea
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trophic ecology of meiofauna: Response to sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms in the Baltic Sea
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Marine soft sediments are the second largest habitat on Earth. How animal communities in this habitat are structured is a central issue in marine ecology. Food is an important limiting factor for many benthic populations, and settling organic matter from phytoplankton blooms is of vital importance to them. This thesis discusses the effects of settling phytoplankton blooms on benthic meiofaunal populations in the Baltic Sea and how species interactions affect the fate of settled organic matter. Eutrophication in the Baltic Sea has altered phytoplankton community dynamics, with indications that toxin-producing cyanobacterial blooms may reach the benthos in greater quantity than previously. Paper I found that meiofauna feed on settled cyanobacteria, yet suffer no increase in mortality. However, growth of meiofauna is significantly slower on a diet of cyanobacteria than when fed spring bloom diatoms, indicating that the studied cyanobacteria are nutritionally poor (Paper II). In Paper III we found that the presence of macrofauna reduces the access of meiofauna to settled organic matter, presumably through interference competition that increases when several macrofauna species are present. We also found that meiofaunal populations influence the provision of ecosystem services by benthic microbes. Paper IV shows that when meiofauna is abundant, mineralization of organic matter is positively affected, presumably through facilitation mechanisms. In contrast, paper V reports that degradation of the contaminant naphtalene decreases significantly at high meiofauna abundance.

In conclusion, this thesis shows that type and quality of organic matter available, as well as competition from macrofauna, affect how meiofauna grow and incorporate nutrients. Furthermore we found meiofauna to be an important functional component of the benthic ecosystem, with marked effects on ecosystem processes such as nutrient regeneration and contaminant degradation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, 2010
Keyword
Meiofauna, Cyanobacteria, competition, facilitation, ecosystems processes
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Marine Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-38809 (URN)978-91-7447-083-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-05-27, Högbomsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript. Paper 5: In press.

Available from: 2010-05-05 Created: 2010-04-29 Last updated: 2017-10-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nascimento, F.J.A.Elmgren, R.
By organisation
Department of Systems Ecology
In the same journal
Limnology and Oceanography
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 134 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf