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Total workload as related to psychological well-being and symptoms in full-time employed female and male white-collar workers.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2006 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, Vol. 13, no 2, 131-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most research on the combined effects of paid and unpaid workload has related these factors to stress, depression, and physical symptoms. Thus, comparative knowledge concerning positive aspects of human functioning, such as health and well-being and how they relate to total workload of employed women and men, is limited. Our aim in this study was to investigate how total workload including paid and unpaid work is related to psychological well-being and symptoms in full-time employed women and men. We obtained data on workload, general symptoms, and the Ryff scales covering self-acceptance, environmental mastery, positive relations, personal growth, purpose in life, and autonomy from questionnaires mailed to a stratified sample of highly educated white-collar workers aged between 32 and 58 years. Data from women (n = 430) and men (n = 400) living in partner relationships with at least one child showed that increasing hours of unpaid work was associated with decreasing levels of self-acceptance and environmental mastery in women, whereas paid work was associated with increasing levels of personal growth and decreasing levels of purpose in life. For men, paid work was associated with increasing levels of personal growth and more symptoms. We discuss factors underlying the gender-specific relationships between paid and unpaid work, psychological well-being, and symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 13, no 2, 131-137 p.
Keyword [en]
positive health, total workload, symptoms, gender, white collar workers
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-19440DOI: doi:10.1207/s15327558ijbm1302_4OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-19440DiVA: diva2:185964
Note
The research was supported by grants to Ulf Lundberg from the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation and the Swedish Research Council and to Petra Lindfors from the Anna Ahlström and Ellen Terserus Foundation.Available from: 2007-12-21 Created: 2007-12-21 Last updated: 2011-01-11Bibliographically approved

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