Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Self-rated recovery from work stress and allostatic load in women.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2006 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, Vol. 61, no 2, 237-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between self-rated recovery from work stress and biologic dysregulation in terms of allostatic load (AL) and individual biomarkers, respectively, in healthy women within the public health care sector. Methods: Two hundred forty-one women completed self-ratings of recovery and took part in a standardized medical examination, which provided individual biomarkers that were used to compute AL. Results: Cluster analysis of self-rated recovery resulted in three cluster profiles, including (1) recovered women (n=108), (2) nonrecovered women (n=51), and (3) fatigued women (n=82). Sequential logistic regression analysis showed that the fatigued profile had an increased risk for high AL. In contrast, there was no significant difference in individual biomarkers between recovery profiles. Conclusions: The findings establish an association between biologic processes and self-rated recovery from work stress, thus supporting the hypothesis that insufficient recovery may result in high AL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 61, no 2, 237-42 p.
Keyword [en]
recovery, allostatic load, women
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-19968DOI: doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.01.015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-19968DiVA: diva2:186493
Note
This research was supported by grants to Ulf Lundberg from the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation, the Swedish Research Council, and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research and to Petra Lindfors from the Anna Ahlström and Ellen Terserus Foundation.Available from: 2007-12-21 Created: 2007-12-21 Last updated: 2011-01-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
von Thiele, UlricaLindfors, PetraLundberg, Ulf
By organisation
Department of PsychologyCentre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS)
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 24 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf