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Self-rated recovery from work stress and allostatic load in women.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2006 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, Vol. 13, no S1, 352- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This cross-sectional study was set to investigate the relationships between self-rated recovery from work stress and biological dysregulation in terms of allostatic load and individual biomarkers, respectively. 241 healthy women within the public health care sector completed self-ratings of recovery and took part in a standardized medical examination which provided individual biomarkers. These biomarkers were used to compute allostatic load, a summary indicator of biological challenges of multiple bodily systems. Cluster analysis of self-rated recovery resulted in three distinct cluster profiles: 1) recovered women (n = 108), with sufficient recovery and low levels of fatigue 2) non-recovered women (n = 51), with poor recovery in general and poor long term recovery in particular and 3) fatigued women (n = 82), characterized by poor short term recovery and high levels of mental and physical fatigue. A sequential logistic regression analysis was performed and the risk of high allostatic load was predicted from cluster group membership while controlling for age, education and whether or not participants had children living at home. Odds ratios showed that higher age and belonging to the fatigued profile were associated with high allostatic load. In contrast, there were no significant differences in individual biomarkers between recovery profiles. This study provides support for a focus on cumulative load when investigating the biological pathways of self-rated recovery from work stress. Furthermore, it adds to the research field by clarifying how self-rated recovery from work stress is related to allostatic load in healthy women employed in the public health care sector, which suggests that assessment of self-rated recovery from work could be used to prevent future ill health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 13, no S1, 352- p.
Keyword [en]
occupational health, biological dysregulation, recovery profiles
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-19970OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-19970DiVA: diva2:186495
Note
This research was supported by grants to Ulf Lundberg from the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation, the Swedish Research Council, and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research and to Petra Lindfors from the Anna Ahlström and Ellen Terserus Foundation.Available from: 2007-12-21 Created: 2007-12-21 Last updated: 2011-01-11Bibliographically approved

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