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The Moderating Role of Employability in the Relationship between Organizational changes and job insecurity
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2007 (English)In: The XIIIth European Congress of Work, Stockholm, May 9-12, 2007, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It has been proposed that the world of work has changed substantially during the last decades, implying that reorganizing activities has become more common. In the same line of research it has been argued that during an organizational change working life becomes more volatile. It could thus be argued that individuals may perceive job insecurity during such changes. However, few researchers have investigated the moderating role of employability. The aim of our study is to investigate if individuals that has experienced organizational change also report more job insecurity than those individuals that has not experienced an change and also if employability has a moderating role. The present study used questionnaire data from a representative sample of Swedish citizens between 25 and 50 years of age in 2005. Preliminary results indicate that individuals that have experienced an organizational change are more likely to report high levels of job insecurity and also that individuals reporting low levels of employability are more likely to report higher levels of job insecurity. In addition we found an interaction effect between organizational change and employability indicating that the difference between experiencing a change and not when reporting low employability is greater than for those individuals reporting high employability. A possible explanation could be that individuals feeling employable are not affected by an organizational change because they have opportunities in the labour market.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-20666OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-20666DiVA, id: diva2:187192
Conference
The XIIIth European Congress of Work, Stockholm, May 9-12, 2007
Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2011-06-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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