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The impact of pay-related justice perceptions on employee work attitudes, psychological well-being, and work-related behavior.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2006 (English)In: 7th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology.: Dublin, Ireland, November 8-10, 2006., 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

The use of individualized pay has increased during the last decades. Employers expect individualized pay systems to bring about more efficient and motivated employees, who are willing to heighten their work efforts in order to achieve organizational goals. A certain amount of cooperation and communication between supervisor and employee throughout the different parts in the individualized pay-setting process is required. Although research on leadership and its impact on employees perceptions are extensive (Pfeffer, 1997), there is need to study whether interpersonal competency of leaders in the pay-setting process affects outcomes such as employee satisfaction, performance and well-being. It would be reasonable to assume that employees who have a positive view of the supervisor-employee relationship and regards the supervisor’s conduct in the pay-setting process as fair, also would experience a greater satisfaction, commitment, and are less inclined to quit than individuals with more negative perceptions of the relationship with their supervisor and his/her conduct in the pay-setting process. Questionnaire data was collected among 721 health care workers. The response rate was 81 percent (N=582). The proportion of women was 88 percent, and the mean age 48 (SD=10) years. The results indicate that a clear communication concerning expectations and goals is probably the most important supervisor quality for all five outcomes, followed by supervisor legitimacy and competency, respectful treatment and gender equality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006.
Keyword [en]
wages, leadership, fairness
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-21252OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-21252DiVA: diva2:187778
Available from: 2007-12-06 Created: 2007-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Andersson-Stråberg, TeresiaSverke, MagnusNäswall, Katharina
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