Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Problem- and emotion-focused coping in a demanding working life.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2006 (English)In: The VIth International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health: Miami, 2-4 March 2006., 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

In the constant strive for competitiveness, organizations try to deliver their products and services at a faster pace and with higher quality, resulting in increased demands for employee effectiveness and competence. High demands are known to be a risk factor for stress. Employees who perceive their work situation as stressful are likely to experience negative consequences, such as negative work-related attitudes and deteriorated health. The extent of the negative consequences of a stressful work situation most likely depends on the strategies employees use to cope with the situation. Some studies indicate that problem-focused strategies may be the most effective to cope with stressful situations, while other studies have shown emotion-focused strategies to be more effective. The aim of this study is to further investigate the role of problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies in reducing negative consequences of the work stressors quantitative and qualitative workload for work-related attitudes and health. The study also investigates potential synergy effects of a combination of the two coping strategies.

Data was collected by questionnaires in March 2005. The sample consists of 252 salaried employees (response rate 86 %) who work in a Swedish firm of accountants. Moderated multiple regression analyses were conducted for each outcome (job satisfaction, organizational commitment, well-being and physical health). Age and gender were used as control variables.

The results showed that both problem- and emotion-focused coping strategies could reduce the negative effects of high workload. Two-way interactions indicated that more problem-focused coping moderated the relation between workload and well-being, while emotion-focused coping moderated the relation between workload and physical health. Three-way interactions indicated that problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies in combination seemed to have the potential to alleviate the negative effects of high workload for organizational commitment and well-being. These results indicate that in order to cope with high workload, both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies are useful, either separate or in combination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006.
Keyword [en]
coping strategies, workload, strain
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-21305OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-21305DiVA: diva2:187831
Available from: 2007-12-07 Created: 2007-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Falkenberg, HelenaNäswall, Katharina
By organisation
Department of Psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 74 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf