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Gender differences in coping with job insecurity.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2006 (English)In: The Sixth Conference on Psychology and Health: Rolduc, the Netherlands, May 8-10, 2006., 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Flexibility demands on organizations along with an ever-changing economic environment have made the working situation for employees less stable and more unpredictable. Perceptions of job insecurity have been more frequently reported and researched. Such perceived threats to one’s future employment have been shown to give rise to stress experiences and have been linked to several different negative outcomes, such as strain reactions, dissatisfaction with the job, and turnover intention. However, the reactions are not the same for all individuals who experience job insecurity. It has been suggested that coping strategies moderate the relationship between job insecurity and outcomes, and that some coping strategies are more effective than others. To date, few studies have investigated whether problem-focused or emotion-focused coping strategies are more frequently used, or are more effective in dealing with job insecurity perceptions. Also, previous research has indicated that there are some gender differences in the reactions to job insecurity. Such gender differences may be attributed to different coping strategies. For example, it has been found that women tend to use emotion-focused strategies to a greater extent than men, who typically use problem-focused strategies in dealing with other types of stressors. The purpose of the present study is to investigate gender differences in the coping with job insecurity. In doing this, the answers to the following two research questions will be sought. First, are there gender differences in coping with the stressor of job insecurity? Second, do the different coping strategies moderate the relationship between job insecurity and well-being outcomes differently for women as compared to men? These questions are tested in a sample of Swedish civil servants (data is currently being collected), by conducting a multiple group comparison using SEM. The results will indicate to what extent women and men differ in their utilization of coping strategies, and whether they are effective to different extents for women and men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006.
Keyword [en]
job insecurity, coping, gender
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-21379OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-21379DiVA: diva2:187906
Available from: 2007-12-10 Created: 2007-12-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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