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Post-decision Processes: Consolidation and value conflicts in decision making
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2004 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The studies in the present thesis focus on post-decision processes using the theoretical framework of Differentiation and Consolidation Theory. This thesis consists of three studies. In all these studies, pre-decision evaluations are compared with post-decision evaluations in order to explore differences in evaluations of decision alternatives before and after a decision. The main aim of the studies was to describe and gain a clearer and better understanding of how people re-evaluate information, following a decision for which they have experienced the decision and outcome. The studies examine how the attractiveness evaluations of important attributes are restructured from the pre-decision to the post-decision phase; particularly restructuring processes of value conflicts. Value conflict attributes are those in which information speaks against the chosen alternative in a decision. The first study investigates an important real-life decision and illustrates different post-decision (consolidation) processes following the decision. The second study tests whether decisions with value conflicts follow the same consolidation (post-decision restructuring) processes when the conflict is controlled experimentally, as in earlier studies of less controlled real-life decisions. The third study investigates consolidation and value conflicts in decisions in which the consequences are controlled and of different magnitudes.

The studies in the present thesis have shown how attractiveness restructuring of attributes in conflict occurs in the post-decision phase. Results from the three studies indicated that attractiveness restructuring of attributes in conflict was stronger for important real-life decisions (Study 1) and in situations in which real consequences followed a decision (Study 3) than in more controlled, hypothetical decision situations (Study 2).

Finally, some proposals for future research are suggested, including studies of the effects of outcomes and consequences on consolidation of prior decisions and how a decision maker’s involvement affects his or her pre- and post-decision processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Psykologiska institutionen , 2004. , 51 p.
Keyword [en]
Decision making, post-decision processes, differentiation and consolidation, value conflicts
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-169ISBN: 91-7265-898-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-169DiVA: diva2:190429
Public defence
2004-06-02, David Magnussonsalen (U31), hus 8, Frescati hagväg 8, Stockholm, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2004-05-12 Created: 2004-05-12Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Predecision conflict and different patterns of postdecision attractiveness restructuring: empirical illustrations from an important real-life decision
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predecision conflict and different patterns of postdecision attractiveness restructuring: empirical illustrations from an important real-life decision
1997 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 38, no 3, 243-251 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study presents different postdecision consolidation patterns following decisions made under value conflicts. The different patterns wereillustrated by case studies of real-life decisions concerning university programs. There were five program alternatives each of whichbranched into a different professional area. These decisions were very important to the students. The subjects were followed during a year,from a couple of months before they made their choice of program and during several months after the start of the programs. Differentpostdecision strategies for consolidating a prior decision were derived from Differentiation and Consolidation Theory (Svenson, 1992). Thestrategies involved the following postdecision attractiveness restructuring patterns. (1) Reversing an attractiveness disadvantage into anadvantage on a conflict attribute, (2) Compensating for a disadvantage through increase of an advantage of another attribute, (3) Reversingdisadvantage on a conflict and decreasing advantage on non-conflict attribute(s), and (4) Increasing advantage for chosen alternative onall attributes. In addition, (5) downgrading of importance of the conflict attribute or a complete elimination of this attribute is also apossible way of consolidating the prior decision. The results illustrated the above consolidation patterns. A comparison with subjects whomade the same decisions but with no value conflict indicated that postdecision consolidation was largely driven by value conflicts at thetime of decision in conjunction with the outcome of the decision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 1997
Keyword
Decision making, value conflict, postdecision processes
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-23153 (URN)10.1111/1467-9450.00033 (DOI)
Note
Part of urn:nbn:se:su:diva-169Available from: 2004-05-12 Created: 2004-05-12 Last updated: 2009-12-22Bibliographically approved
2. Value conflict and post-decision consolidation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value conflict and post-decision consolidation
2002 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 43, no 4, 325-333 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The primary goal of the present study was to investigate how the mental representations of value conflicts are restructured after a decision. A value conflict exists if a chosen alternative is less attractive than a non–chosen alternative on one important attribute when a decision is made. In order to follow up earlier field studies with no experimental control over value conflicts, the present study induced value conflicts in the laboratory. This was done through associating the more attractive of two alternatives with a smaller probability of success. The first hypothesis was that consolidation of value conflict attributes should follow the same pattern when the conflict is controlled experimentally as in earlier studies of real–life decisions. The second hypothesis was that consolidation should be weaker in a non–consequential laboratory study than in the earlier real–life studies. The third hypothesis was that stronger value conflicts (that is, value conflict on more important attributes) lead to greater consolidation effects than weaker value conflicts. The results showed that participants consolidated the value conflicts in the same way as in real–life decisions, with the difference that also less important attributes were consolidated in the present study. However, the consolidation effects were not so strong that they caused advantage reversals on a conflict attribute, as in the earlier field studies with real outcomes and consequences. There was no relationship between strength of conflict and consolidation. The fact that no advantage reversals were registered leads to questions about the ecological validity of laboratory studies of non–consequential decision making

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2002
Keyword
Decision making, post-decision consolidation processes, value conflict decisions
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-23154 (URN)10.1111/1467-9450.00301 (DOI)
Note
Part of urn:nbn:se:su:diva-169Available from: 2004-05-12 Created: 2004-05-12 Last updated: 2009-12-22Bibliographically approved
3. Which movie will I go to?: Consolidation of choices with consequences of different magnitudes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Which movie will I go to?: Consolidation of choices with consequences of different magnitudes
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-23155 (URN)
Note
Part of urn:nbn:se:su:diva-169Available from: 2004-05-12 Created: 2004-05-12 Last updated: 2010-01-29Bibliographically approved

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