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Mobile phones and driving: A review of contemporary research
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2005 In: Cognition Technology and Work, ISSN 1435-5558, Vol. 7, no 3, 182-197 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 7, no 3, 182-197 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-24176OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-24176DiVA: diva2:196945
Note
Part of urn:nbn:se:su:diva-6730Available from: 2007-05-04 Created: 2007-04-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Cognitive Workload and the Driver: Understanding the Effects of Cognitive Workload on Driving from a Human Information Processing Perspective
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive Workload and the Driver: Understanding the Effects of Cognitive Workload on Driving from a Human Information Processing Perspective
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This doctoral dissertation in psychology focuses on present day transport research issues. Society is affected by the way that our transport system works. In one way or another, the use of the transport system involves different levels of human involvement and control.

The main focus of this dissertation is to understand some important effects of cognitive workload on driving. The driver’s cognitive workload is related to human information processing capacity and the use and allocation of the driver’s attention. In-vehicle technologies are of particular interest in the context of driver workload and human information processing.

The rationale of this thesis starts with the need to explore and develop a sensitive and objective measure of cognitive workload using the peripheral detection task (PDT) method. The next step continues to study the effects of cognitive workload on the human information processing stages (HIPS) framework and the way in which human information processing can be affected by performance shaping factors (PSFs). One of the PSFs had a beneficial effect on performance (experience) and one had a detrimental effect on performance (distraction).

In summary, it is clear that the human driver is limited in the number and the complexity of the tasks he or she can perform at any given time. Moreover, making mistakes, to err, is part of being human; we are fallible. It is impossible to eliminate all driver error so it is therefore important to create an environment for the driver so that his or her slips, lapses and mistakes can be detected and recovered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Psykologiska institutionen, 2007
Keyword
Cognitive workload, human information processing, driver distraction, human error, performance shaping factors (PSF), intelligent transport systems (ITS), peripheral detection task (PDT)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-6730 (URN)978-91-7155-409-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-05-25, David Magnussonsalen (U31), hus 8, Frescati Hagväg 8, Stockholm, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2007-05-04 Created: 2007-04-18Bibliographically approved

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