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Employability perceptions: Nature, determinants, and implications for health and well-being
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The general aim of the present thesis is to increase our understanding of perceived employability. Employability perceptions refer to individuals’ beliefs about their possibilities of finding new, equal, or better employment. How people perceive their possibilities of getting employment is important in a labour market characterised by flexibility and uncertainty, and the present thesis sets out to investigate the nature, determinants, and implications of employability perceptions, using two population-based samples. In Study I, the aim was to study if employability and self-efficacy are two distinct but related constructs and, along with this, to investigate the nature of their association. The results from this study indicated that employability was distinct from self-efficacy and, furthermore, that employability predicted subsequent self-efficacy. In Study II, the aim was to identify predictors of perceived employability. The combination of situational and individual factors was identified as important for employability perceptions. National economic prosperity, living/working in metropolitan areas, poor physical and good psychological work environments, formal education, and competency development were found to be positively associated with perceived employability. The aim of Study III was to investigate if employability could predict subsequent health and well-being. The results from this study implied that individuals who reported higher levels of employability also reported better global health and mental well-being, but not physical complaints, one year later, after controlling for work environment variables and previous health status. In conclusion, the present thesis has implications for theory as well as practice when it concludes that employability is not primarily a self-evaluation, that it is dependent on individual as well as situational factors, and that it has implications for health and well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Psykologiska institutionen , 2008. , 65 p.
Keyword [en]
employability, employability perceptions, flexibility, individualisation, changing labour market, self-evaluation, self-efficacy, dual labour market, human capital, health, well-being
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-7520ISBN: 9789171556363 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-7520DiVA: diva2:198489
Public defence
2008-05-30, David Magnussonsalen (U31), hus 8, Frescati Hagväg 8, Stockholm, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-05-08 Created: 2008-05-08Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Investigating the relationship between employability and self-efficacy: A cross-lagged analysis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the relationship between employability and self-efficacy: A cross-lagged analysis
2008 (English)In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 7, no 4, 413-425 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The construct of employability has been conceptually related to self-efficacy in different ways. Employability has sometimes been regarded as an equivalent to self-efficacy, or as a distinct but related phenomenon. Since the relationship between the two phenomena has not been subjected to empirical scrutiny, the aim of the present study is to analyze whether self-efficacy and employability are two distinct but related constructs, and if they are, to investigate the direction of their relationship. The data (N = 1730) were collected through a two-wave longitudinal survey with one year between each data collection (2005 and 2006). The results of confirmatory factor analysis showed that the measures of employability and self-efficacy were distinct from one another, within and over measurement points, indicating that these are related but separate constructs. The results of latent variable cross-lagged analysis showed that employability predicted subsequent self-efficacy, even after controlling for age, gender, educational level, and regional differences. Thus, employability is not an expression of efficacy beliefs, but rather, the strengthening of employability perceptions may have beneficial effects on more general efficacy beliefs.

Keyword
Employability; Self-efficacy; Structural equation modeling
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-24893 (URN)10.1080/13594320801969699 (DOI)000260676300001 ()
Note
Part of urn:nbn:se:su:diva-7520Available from: 2008-05-08 Created: 2008-05-08 Last updated: 2011-01-18Bibliographically approved
2. Predicting perceived employability: Human capital or labour market opportunities?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting perceived employability: Human capital or labour market opportunities?
2006 In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, Vol. 27, no 2, 223-244 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-24894 (URN)
Note
Part of urn:nbn:se:su:diva-7520Available from: 2008-05-08 Created: 2008-05-08Bibliographically approved
3. The relationship between perceived employability and subsequent health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between perceived employability and subsequent health
2007 In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, Vol. 21, no 3, 279-292 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-24895 (URN)000251508500005 ()
Note
Part of urn:nbn:se:su:diva-7520Available from: 2008-05-08 Created: 2008-05-08Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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