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Contribution of residential wood combustion to hourly winter aerosol in Northern Sweden determined by positive matrix factorization
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
2008 (English)In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, Vol. 8, no 13, 3639-3653 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The combined effect of residential wood combustion (RWC) emissions with stable atmospheric conditions. which frequently occurs in Northern Sweden during wintertime, can deteriorate the air quality even in small towns. To estimate the contribution of RWC to the total atmospheric aerosol loading, positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to hourly mean particle number size distributions measured in a residential area in Lycksele during winter 2005/2006. The sources were identified based on the particle number size distribution profiles of the PMF factors., the diurnal contributions patterns estimated by PMF for both weekends and weekdays, and correlation of the modeled particle number concentration per factor with measured aerosol mass concentrations (PM10, PM1, and light-absorbing carbon M-LAC). Through these analyses. the factors were identified as local traffic (factor 1), local RWC (factor 2), and local RWC plus Ion-range transport (LRT) of aerosols (factor 3). In some occasions, the PMF model could not separate the contributions of local RWC from background concentrations since their particle number size distributions partially overlapped. As a consequence, we report the contribution of RWC as a range of values, being the minimum determined by factor 2 and the possible maximum as the contributions of both factors 2 and 3. A multiple linear regression (MLR) of observed PM10, PM1, total particle number, and M-LAC concentrations is carried out to determine the source contribution to these aerosol variables. The results reveal RWC is an important source of atmospheric particles in the size range 25-606 nm (44-57%), PM10 (36-82%), PM1 (31-83%), and M-LAC (40-76%) mass concentrations in the winter season.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 8, no 13, 3639-3653 p.
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-25068DOI: 10.5194/acp-8-3639-2008ISI: 000257516800016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-25068DiVA: diva2:198828
Available from: 2008-05-14 Created: 2008-05-09 Last updated: 2012-05-09Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Impact of residential wood combustion on urban air quality
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of residential wood combustion on urban air quality
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Wood combustion is mainly used in cold regions as a primary or supplemental space heating source in residential areas. In several industrialized countries, there is a renewed interest in residential wood combustion (RWC) as an alternative to fossil fuel and nuclear power consumption. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the impact of RWC on the air quality in urban areas. To this end, a field campaign was conducted in Northern Sweden during wintertime to characterize atmospheric aerosol particles and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and to determine their source apportionment.

A large day-to-day and hour-to-hour variability in aerosol concentrations was observed during the intensive field campaign. On average, total carbon contributed a substantial fraction of PM10 mass concentrations (46%) and aerosol particles were mostly in the fine fraction (PM1 accounted for 76% of PM10). Evening aerosol concentrations were significantly higher on weekends than on weekdays which could be associated to the use of wood burning for recreational purposes or higher space heat demand when inhabitants spend longer time at home. It has been shown that continuous aerosol particle number size distribution measurements successfully provided source apportionment of atmospheric aerosol with high temporal resolution. The first compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of atmospheric PAH demonstrated its potential to provide quantitative information on the RWC contribution to individual PAH. RWC accounted for a large fraction of particle number concentrations in the size range 25-606 nm (44-57%), PM10 (36-82%), PM1 (31-83%), light-absorbing carbon (40-76%) and individual PAH (71-87%) mass concentrations.

These studies have demonstrated that the impact of RWC on air quality in an urban location can be very important and largely exceed the contribution of vehicle emissions during winter, particularly under very stable atmospheric conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Institutionen för tillämpad miljövetenskap (ITM), 2008. 40 p.
Keyword
residential wood combustion, air quality, aerosols, black carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, particulate matter, particle size distributions, source apportionment, positive matrix factorization, compound-specific radiocarbon analysis
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-7682 (URN)978-91-7155-608-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-06-04, William-Olssonsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 8 A, Stockholm, 13:00
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Available from: 2008-05-14 Created: 2008-05-09Bibliographically approved

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