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Tonårsnormer i förändring?: en empirisk studie av 15-åringar i en mellanstor svensk stad 1969 och 1995
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Responsible organisation
2000 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)Alternative title
Are adolescent norms changing? : an empirical study of 15-year-old adolescents in a medium-sized Swedish town in 1969 and 1995 (English)
Abstract [en]

The thesis concerns norms for two generations of adolescents. Data were taken from: a) the Swedish longitudinal research program “Individual Development and Adaptation”, which is based on a sample of about 1100 girls and boys, aged around 15 years in 1969; b) an identical data collection, performed in 1995 on a sample of about 1200 adolescents in the same medium-sized town as the earlier sample. The same norm questionnaire, covering the adolescents’ norms and their perceptions of the norms of parents and friends, was administered to the two cohorts. The holistic, interactionist perspective provides a meta-theoretical framework, focusing on various norm-breaking situations as perceived by adolescents.

The results presented in Part III concern the situation of the adolescents in 1995. Most girls and boys show rejecting attitudes to the norm-breaking behaviors. They perceive the attitudes of friends as less rejecting than their own. A majority perceive the attitudes of parents as the most rejecting. Compared to their attitudes, the intentions of most adolescents imply a greater propensity to break norms. A majority perceive their parents as expecting them to have a rejecting approach to norm breaking. Friends are perceived as being more liberal about breaking norms. Most of the adolescents do not break the studied norms.

The results presented in Part IV show that, compared to the cohort in 1969, at a global level both girls and boys in 1995 display more rejection of normbreaking behaviors in five dimensions. Moreover, over time boys, but not girls, show significant shifts towards more rejection in their disposition to break norms. More specifically, in most of the studied norm dimensions there is a rejection of norm-breaking in almost all the studied situations. The only clear exception is that in 1995 girls have moved towards a higher acceptance of pilfering. The focus on polarisation shows some increase in both acceptance and/or rejection in the studied norm dimensions. The results also reveal a structural stability over time in girls’ norm profiles but less so for boys’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Psykologiska institutionen , 2000. , p. 306
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-7954ISBN: 91-7265-057-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-7954DiVA, id: diva2:199343
Public defence
2000-03-30, Sal U31, Psykologiska institutionen, Frescati Hagväg 8, Stockholm, 10:00
Opponent
Available from: 2000-03-09 Created: 2000-03-09 Last updated: 2018-03-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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