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English: language of hope or broken dreams?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
1992 (English)In: Adult basic education in South Africa: literacy, English as a second language, and numeracy / [ed] Barbara Hutton, Cape Town: Oxford University Press, 1992, 152-218 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter provides a critical overview of the major debates, theories and teaching approaches in second language education for adults with little or no formal education. The first two sections examine the contested role of English as a language of access in South Africa and the debates surrounding the language of instruction for initial literacy. They draw on Nicaraguan and Mozambican literacy campaigns to illuminate some of the consequences of decisions on language of instruction for large-scale campaigns. The third section critically examines current approaches to teaching English as a second language to adults in South Africa in terms of the understandings of language and language learning that underpin them. The fourth and final section attempts to lay the groundwork for the second or additional language component of a future adult education policy. Framed by a vision of participatory democracy, it proposes a model which integrates theoretical principles from Freirean-inspired popular education, adult education and second language learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cape Town: Oxford University Press, 1992. 152-218 p.
Keyword [en]
Adult basic education, Adult literacy, English as a second language (ESL), Language teaching, Curriculum, Language education policy, South Africa
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-26675ISBN: 0195707095 (print)ISBN: 9780195707090 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-26675DiVA: diva2:210899
Available from: 2009-04-06 Created: 2009-04-06 Last updated: 2013-07-09Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Changing conceptions of literacies, language and development: Implications for the provision of adult basic education in South Africa
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing conceptions of literacies, language and development: Implications for the provision of adult basic education in South Africa
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study aims to contribute to the growing body of knowledge on the circumstances under which adult education, in particular adult basic education, can support and occasionally initiate participatory development, social action and the realisation of citizenship rights. It traces developments in adult basic education in South Africa, and more specifically literacy and language learning, over the years 1981 to 2001, with reference to specific multilingual contexts in the Northern and Western Cape.

The thesis is based on four individual studies, documenting an arc from grassroots work to national policy development and back. Study I, written in the early 1990s, critically examines approaches to teaching English to adults in South Africa at the time and proposes a participatory curriculum model for the additional language component of a future adult education policy. Study II is an account of attempts to implement this model and explores the implications of going to scale with such an approach.  Studies III and IV draw on a qualitative study of an educator development programme after the transition to democracy. Study III uses Bourdieu's theory of practice and the concept of reflexivity to illuminate some of  the connections between local discursive practices, self-formation, and broader relations of power. Study IV uses Iedema's (1999) concept of resemiotisation to trace the ways in which individuals re-shaped available representational resources to mobilise collective agency in community-based workshops. The summary provides a framework for these studies by locating and critiquing each within shifts in the political economy of South Africa. It reflects on a history of research and practice, raising questions to do with voice, justice, power, agency, and desire. Overall, this thesis argues for a reconceptualisation of ABET that is more strongly aligned with development goals and promotes engagement with new forms of state/society/economy relations.

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Stockholm University, 2009. 65 p.
Series
Dissertations in Bilingualism, ISSN 1400-5921 ; 18
Keyword
adult literacy, adult basic education, agency, citizenship, critical applied linguistics, development, linguistic citizenship, multilingualism, reflexivity, resemiotisation, voice.
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Bilingualism Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-26581 (URN)978-91-7155-852-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-05-18, G-salen, Arrheniuslaboratorierna, Svante Arrhenius väg 16, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-04-27 Created: 2009-04-01 Last updated: 2010-06-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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