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Kvinnors och mäns återhämtning från psykisk ohälsa
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
2009 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim with this thesis is to describe and analyze women’s and men’s recovery processes. More specifically, the aim is to determine what women and men with experience of mental illness describe as contributing to the personal recovery process. The point of departure for the studies was 30 in-depth interviews conducted with 15 men and 15 women. The selection of interview subjects was limited to individuals who had been treated in 24-hour psychiatric care and diagnosed as having schizophrenia, psychosis, a personality disorder, or a bipolar disorder.

 

Four studies have been carried.  Study 1 was a baseline article that examined what people in recovery from mental illness outline as facilitating factors to their recovery. The results that emerged from that study indicated areas for further analysis to condense the understanding of the recovery process. In study 2 the similarities and the differences in recovery described by women and men were examined. In Study 3 women’s and men’s meaning-making with reference to severe mental illness facilitate the recovery process were studied. The forth study explored how peer-support contribute to women’s and men’s recovery from mental illness.

 

The results emphasize recovery from mental illness as a social process in which relationships play a key role in creating new identities beside the mental illness. For a majority of the participants meeting peers facilitated the recovery process. The participants described how peer support meant an end to isolation and became an arena for identification, connection, and being important to others. Throughout these recovery processes the impact of gender has been emphasized. The results from this thesis provide new insight into gender as an important factor in understanding the recovery processes. The results from the four studies emphasize the mental patient, the psychiatric interventions and the individual recovery strategies as being influenced by gender constructions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet , 2009. , 170 p.
Series
Rapport i socialt arbete, ISSN 0281-6288 ; 130
Keyword [en]
recovery, mental illness, gender, peer-support, meaning
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-26713ISBN: 978-91-7155-795-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-26713DiVA: diva2:211088
Public defence
2009-05-15, Aula Svea, Sveavägen 160, Stockholm, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-04-24 Created: 2009-04-08 Last updated: 2013-07-09Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Recovery from mental illness, a gender perspective
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recovery from mental illness, a gender perspective
2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 3, 557-564 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and research objectives: Recovery from mental illness is an individual process characterized by regaining a positive sense of self and developing a new meaning. Knowledge concerning differences between male and female recovery processes is, however, limited. The objective of this study was to determine gender diversity in what individuals described as decisive factors for their recovery.

 

Subjects and methods:  In this qualitative study based on grounded theory 30 first-person accounts of recovery from mental illness are examined. After informed consent data were collected through in-depth interviews with people in recovery from psychosis, bipolar disorders or personality disorders.

 

Results: The results show that in spite of structural gender inequalities, female gender norms seem to be an advantage in the recovery process. The female participants were focused on making sense and meaning in their recovery process, while the male participants were focused on control over symptoms and reinforcement of traditional roles such as occupation and independence. Another result showed psychiatric hospitalization to mainly contribute to male recovery processes.

 

Conclusion: These results provide new insights into gender as an important factor in understanding recovery processes and in providing care to facilitate these processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2010
Keyword
recovery, mental illness, gender
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-26709 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2009.00748.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-04-08 Created: 2009-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
2. How men and women in recovery make meaning to severe mental illness
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How men and women in recovery make meaning to severe mental illness
2009 (English)In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 18, no 5, 433-440 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Creating a new meaning of the illness, changing values and expectations due to the illness are seen as important factors in recovery from mental illness.

Aims: In this study, conducted in Sweden, male and female meaning making of severe mental illness is explored and how these meanings compass the recovery process.

Method: Through 30 in-depth interviews male and female meaning of mental illness are explored through a grounded theory analysis. Results: In the process of making meaning illness reason emerged as the core category. But the reasons differed both in relation to gender and within the two genders. Four patterns of response were found in the analysis of the material. These four patterns influenced how the recovery process was encompassed. Three of the four groups were restructing the meaning of the illness in a more favorable way contributing to a redirection of life towards authenticity.

Conclusions: The results underline a demand for further research on recovery achievements connected to meaning making and changes in attitude. One such area is to create a meaning in one’s life where gender is reconsidered in relation to the individual’s capacity and life situation.

Keyword
Meaning, mental illness, recovery, gender
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-26710 (URN)10.3109/09638230902968233 (DOI)000271664800009 ()
Available from: 2009-04-08 Created: 2009-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
3. The power of identification. Peer support in recovery from mental illness
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The power of identification. Peer support in recovery from mental illness
2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 2, 83-90 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract: Peer support has been described as facilitating individuals’ recovery from mental illness and offer useful support, hope and encouragement. The aim of this study was to explore how individuals with experience of severe mental illness in Sweden perceived peer support facilitating their recovery.

The results from the grounded theory analysis of 24 in depth interviews illustrated that despite diagnoses of severe mental illness, often described in terms of an inability to interact with other people, the identification when meeting others with similar experiences was powerful. The participants described how peer support meant an end to isolation and became an arena for identification, normalization, connection and being important to others. Involvement in the peer support group was related to time and recovery stage, the participants pay attention to their own achievements in relation to peers and their recovery progress, comparing their level of wellness with that of their peers.

Keyword
peer support, recovery, mental illness, gender
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-26711 (URN)10.1080/15017410903478956 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-04-08 Created: 2009-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
4. Social relationships as a decisive factor in recovering from severe mental illness
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social relationships as a decisive factor in recovering from severe mental illness
2009 (English)In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, ISSN 0020-7640, E-ISSN 1741-2854, Vol. 4, no 55, 336-347 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recovery research often describes recovery from mental illness as a complex individual process. In this article a social perspective on recovery is developed.

Aims: To ascertain which factors people regard as decisive to their own recovery and what makes them beneficial.

Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 58 persons in Sweden who had recovered from severe mental illness. Interviews were qualitatively analyzed using grounded theory.

Results: Three dimensions of contributing recovery factors were identified. Social relationships emerged as the core category throughout these dimensions.

Conclusions: The results show that recovery processes are social processes in which social relationships play a key role.

Keyword
recovery, mental illness, contributing factors, social relationships
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-32606 (URN)10.1177/0020764008093686 (DOI)000267323900004 ()
Available from: 2009-12-14 Created: 2009-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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