Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Phylogenetics of Coenonymphina (Nymphalidae Satyrinae) and the problem of rooting rapid radiations
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 54, no 2, 386-394 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report a rapid radiation of a group of butterflies within the family Nymphalidae and examine some aspects of popular analytical methods in dealing with rapid radiations. We attempted to infer the phylogeny of butterflies belonging to the subtribe Coenonymphina sensu lato using five genes (4398bp) with Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses. Initial analyses suggested that the group has undergone rapid speciation within Australasia. We further analyzed the dataset with different outgroup combinations the choice of which had a profound effect on relationships within the ingroup. Modelling methods recovered Coenonymphina as a monophyletic group to the exclusion of Zipaetis and Orsotriaena, irrespective of outgroup combination. Maximum Parsimony occasionally returned a polyphyletic Coenonymphina, with Argyronympha grouping with outgroups, but this was strongly dependent on the outgroups used. We analyzed the ingroup without any outgroups and found that the relationships inferred among taxa were different from those inferred when either of the outgroup combinations was used, and this was true for all methods. We also tested whether a hard polytomy is a better hypothesis to explain our dataset, but could not find conclusive evidence. We therefore conclude that the major lineages within Coenonymphina form a near-hard polytomy with regard to each other. The study highlights the importance of testing different outgroups rather than using results from a single outgroup combination of a few taxa, particularly in difficult cases where basal nodes appear to receive low support. We provide a revised classification of Coenonymphina; Zipaetis and Orsotriaena are transferred to the tribe Eritina.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 54, no 2, 386-394 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-29524DOI: 10.1016/j.ympev.2009.08.012ISI: 000273758200007PubMedID: 19686856OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-29524DiVA: diva2:233915
Available from: 2009-09-03 Created: 2009-09-03 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The dispersal–vicariance pendulum and butterfly biogeography
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The dispersal–vicariance pendulum and butterfly biogeography
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The relative importance of dispersal and vicariance in speciation is a subject of long standing debate. The earliest historical biogeographers invoked dispersal to explain disjunct distributions. With the advent of phylogenetic systematics and the acceptance of plate-tectonic theory, vicariance gained prominence and dispersalist explanations were increasingly rejected in favour of the former. This led to a new paradigm termed ‘vicariance biogeography’. The quintessence of vicariance biogeography is the consideration of vicariance as the null hypothesis in explanations of disjunct distributions. The notion of vicariance being the predominant force in allopatric speciation started gaining increasing acceptance in the biogeographic community. This also came to be reflected in analytical methods, many of which are biased towards vicariant inferences. However, the recent past has seen this vicariance-dominated view being confronted by a suite of studies demonstrating that dispersal has played a vital role in speciation and is equally important, if not more. In this thesis, I have studied the historical biogeography of nymphalid butterflies (Family Nymphalidae) in the genus Junonia and two subtribes - Coenonymphina and Mycalesina. Junonia is found in all major zoogeographic regions apart from the Palaearctic. Coenonymphina is found in the Holarctic, Neotropical and Australasian regions. Mycalesina is found all over the Old World tropics. The results in the thesis indicate that dispersal has played a crucial role in the diversification of these groups, while there is little evidence for vicariance in any group. I also critique Dispersal-Vicariance analysis, the widely used analytical method in historical biogeography that is based on the principle of parsimony. I use simulated data to highlight various sources of error when using the method, and suggest ways that may help increase the realism of biogeographic inferences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 2009. 12 p.
Keyword
Junonia, Coenonympha, Coenonymphina, Mycalesina, historical biogeography, vicariance, dispersal, DIVA
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-29505 (URN)978-91-7155-936-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-10-09, Lilla hörsalen, Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Frescativägen 40, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: In press. Paper 5: In press.Available from: 2009-09-17 Created: 2009-09-02 Last updated: 2009-09-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kodandaramaiah, UllasaPeña, CarlosNylin, Sören
By organisation
Department of Zoology
In the same journal
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 155 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf