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Is the endangered Fennoscandian arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) population genetically isolated?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8270-7613
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5535-9086
2002 (English)In: Biological Conservation, Vol. 105, no 2, 171-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The arctic fox population in Fennoscandia is on the verge of going extinct after not being able to recover from a severe bottleneck at the end of the 19th century. The Siberian arctic fox population, on the other hand, is large and unthreatened. In order to resolve questions regarding gene flow between, and genetic variation within the populations, a 294 bp long part of the mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 was sequenced. This was done for 17 Swedish, 15 Siberian and two farmed foxes. Twelve variable nucleotide sites were observed, which resulted in 10 different haplotypes. Three haplotypes were found in Sweden and seven haplotypes were found in Siberia. An analysis of molecular variance showed a weak, but significant, differentiation between the populations. No difference in haplotype diversity was found between the populations. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three Swedish haplotypes were not monophyletic compared to the Siberian haplotypes. These results indicate a certain amount of gene flow between the two populations. both before and after the bottleneck. Restocking the Fennoscandian population with arctic foxes from Siberia might therefore be a viable option.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 105, no 2, 171-178 p.
Keyword [en]
genetics, phylogeography, Alopex lagopus, threatened, conservation, BEAR URSUS-ARCTOS, FIELD EXPERIMENT, TREE TOPOLOGIES, DNA, SIZE, SEQUENCES, SEAL
National Category
Zoology
Research subject
Animal Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-29681DOI: 10.1016/S0006-3207(01)00180-XISBN: 0006-3207 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-29681DiVA: diva2:234729
Note

ISI Document Delivery No.: 545FG Times Cited: 8 Cited Reference Count: 39

Available from: 2009-09-10 Created: 2009-09-10 Last updated: 2014-10-13Bibliographically approved

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