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Lysigenous Aerenchyma Formation in Arabidopsis is Controlled by LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
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2007 (English)In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 19, no 11, 3819-3830 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aerenchyma tissues form gas-conducting tubes that provide rootswith oxygen under hypoxic conditions. Although aerenchyma havereceived considerable attention in Zea mays, the signaling eventsand genes controlling aerenchyma induction remain elusive. Here,we show that Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls form lysigenousaerenchyma in response to hypoxia and that this process involvesH2O2 and ethylene signaling. By studying Arabidopsis mutantsthat are deregulated for excess light acclimation, cell death,and defense responses, we find that the formation of lysigenousaerenchyma depends on the plant defense regulators LESION SIMULATINGDISEASE1 (LSD1), ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1), andPHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4) that operate upstream of ethyleneand reactive oxygen species production. The obtained resultsindicate that programmed cell death of lysigenous aerenchymain hypocotyls occurs in a similar but independent manner fromthe foliar programmed cell death. Thus, the induction of aerenchymais subject to a genetic and tissue-specific program. The datalead us to conclude that the balanced activities of LSD1, EDS1,and PAD4 regulate lysigenous aerenchyma formation in responseto hypoxia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 19, no 11, 3819-3830 p.
Keyword [en]
programmed cell death, hydrogen peroxide, ethylene
National Category
Botany
Research subject
Plant Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-30830DOI: 10.1105/tpc.106.048843ISI: 000252268700036OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-30830DiVA: diva2:274332
Available from: 2009-10-28 Created: 2009-10-28 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Control of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in response to environmental stress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Control of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in response to environmental stress
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Plants are exposed to various fluctuations in their environmental conditions - light intensity, temperature, water status - and have to adapt in order to survive. Plant acclimatory responses can include the formation of new tissues, e.g., aerenchyma, or the activation of defense systems, e.g., the ascorbate-glutathione cycle for detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A prominent ROS is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a non-radical molecule formed during the reduction of oxygen. Due to its non-radical nature, H2O2 is more stable than other ROS and this longevity makes it the most abundant ROS in the plant cell and potentially harmful. In spite of this, H2O2 is involved in several signal transduction processes in plant cells, e.g., in the control of stomatal aperture, in plant-symbiont- and in plant-pathogen interactions, also in programmed cell death (PCD). Therefore, it is important for plant cells to maintain a tight control of H2O2 levels.

In this study, the role of H2O2 production and -detoxification was studied in different plant processes. First, signaling leading to aerenchyma formation was studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. This plant shows lysigenous aerenchyma formation, a process involving PCD, which meant it was preceded by H2O2 formation. Second, the role of a H2O2 detoxifying enzyme, cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 2 (APX2) from A. thaliana, in the local and systemic response to excess light stress, was studied by means of the characterization of APX2 knockout mutant lines. Third, antioxidant defense was studied in two types of nitrogen-fixing actinorhizal root nodules with different oxygen metabolism, from Datisca glomerata and Casuarina glauca. Fourth, the role of a plant natriuretic peptide from actinorhizal nodules of Alnus glutinosa, in abiotic stress resistance was studied.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Botany, Stockholm University, 2009. 51 p.
Keyword
Stress, antioxidant defense, ascorbate peroxidase, aerenchyma, actinorhiza
National Category
Botany
Research subject
Plant Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-30849 (URN)978-91-7155-967-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-11-27, Föreläsningssalen, Botanicum, Lilla Frescativägen 5, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
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Note
At the time of the doctoral defence, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paer 2: Manuscript. Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.Available from: 2009-11-05 Created: 2009-10-28 Last updated: 2009-10-29Bibliographically approved

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