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The impact of temperature change on the activity and community composition of sulfate-reducing abcteria in arctic versus temperate marine sediments
Max-Planck Institute for marine Microbiology. (Biogeochemistry Group)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geology and Geochemistry. (Geochemistry)
Max-Planck Institute for marine Microbiology. (Biogeochemistry Group)
2009 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 11, no 7, 1692-1703 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Arctic regions may be particularly sensitive to climate warming and, consequently, rates of carbon mineralization in warming marine sediment may also be affected. Using long-term (24 months) incubation experiments at 0°C, 10°C and 20°C, the temperature response of metabolic activity and community composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria were studied in the permanently cold sediment of north-western Svalbard (Arctic Ocean) and compared with a temperate habitat with seasonally varying temperature (German Bight, North Sea). Short-term <sup>35</sup>S-sulfate tracer incubations in a temperature-gradient block (between −3.5°C and +40°C) were used to assess variations in sulfate reduction rates during the course of the experiment. Warming of arctic sediment resulted in a gradual increase of the temperature optima ( T<sub>opt</sub>) for sulfate reduction suggesting a positive selection of psychrotolerant/mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, high rates at in situ temperatures compared with maximum rates showed the predominance of psychrophilic SRB even at high incubation temperatures. Changing apparent activation energies ( E<sub>a</sub>) showed that increasing temperatures had an initial negative impact on sulfate reduction that was weaker after prolonged incubations, which could imply an acclimatization response rather than a selection process of the SRB community. The microbial community composition was analysed by targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA using catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The results showed the decline of specific groups of SRB and confirmed a strong impact of increasing temperatures on the microbial community composition of arctic sediment. Conversely, in seasonally changing sediment sulfate reduction rates and sulfate-reducing bacterial abundance changed little in response to changing temperature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell , 2009. Vol. 11, no 7, 1692-1703 p.
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Marine Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-32720DOI: 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.01896ISI: 000267660700007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-32720DiVA: diva2:281405
Available from: 2009-12-15 Created: 2009-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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