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The association of early IQ and education with mortality: 65 year longitudinal study in Malmö, Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2009 (English)In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 339, b5282- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To establish whether differences in early IQ explain why people with longer education live longer, or whether differences in father’s or own educational attainment explain why people with higher early IQ live longer.

Design Population based longitudinal study. Mortality risks were estimated with Cox proportional hazards regressions.

Setting Malmö, Sweden.

Participants 1530 children who took IQ tests at age 10 and were followed up until age 75.

Results Own educational attainment was negatively associated with all cause mortality in both sexes, even when early IQ and father’s education were adjusted for (hazard ratio (HR) for each additional year in school 0.91 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.97) for men and HR 0.88 (95 % CI 0.78 to 0.98) for women). Higher early IQ was linked with a reduced mortality risk in men, even when own educational attainment and father’s education were adjusted for (HR for one standard deviation increase in IQ 0.85 (95 % CI 0.75 to 0.96)). In contrast, there was no crude effect of early IQ for women, and women with above average IQ had an increased mortality risk when own educational attainment was adjusted for, but only after the age of 60 (HR 1.60 (95 % CI 1.06 to 2.42)). Adding measures of social career over and above educational attainment to the model (for example, occupational status at age 36 and number of children) only marginally affected the hazard ratio for women with above average IQ (<5%).

Conclusions Mortality differences by own educational attainment were not explained by early IQ. Childhood IQ was independently linked, albeit differently, to male adult mortality and to female adult mortality even when father’s education and own educational attainment was adjusted for, thus social background and own social career seem unlikely to be responsible for mortality differences by childhood IQ. The clear difference in the effect of IQ between men and women suggests that the link between IQ and mortality involves the social and physical environment rather than simply being a marker of a healthy body to begin with. Cognitive skills should, therefore, be addressed in our efforts to create childhood environments that promote health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 339, b5282- p.
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-32842DOI: 10.1136/bmj.b5282OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-32842DiVA: diva2:281762
Available from: 2009-12-17 Created: 2009-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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