Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Conveyor Belt Production of Course Material – a Case Study in Sri Lanka
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
2009 (English)In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Learning / [ed] Dan Remenyi, Reading, UK: Academic Conferences Limited, 2009, 406-412 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we study the content development process for an external bachelor degree in information technology (eBIT) at University of Colombo School of Computing (UCSC) in Sri Lanka. The eBIT degree program was started in the year 2000 and has since 2004 been funded from both the European Union (EU) and from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida). Since the start of the project one of the main focuses has been on content development. Content development at UCSC is instrumental and hierarchal where different actors are responsible for different parts of the content development process. The different roles are Subject Matter Experts (SME) who decide what material that the course should be based on and what knowledge that should be transferred to the students; Instructional Designers (ID) are responsible for organizing the course and material, they decide the pedagogy to be used and how the instructions should be structured; Content Developers (CD) are the ones that create the actual content based on the instructions and material provided by the SMEs and IDs. This study is mainly based on observations that have been done since 2005 but also on interviews, both formal and informal, with UCSC staff. Since 2005 12 field trips have been done by the two authors - each lasting between two and three weeks - so an extensive understanding of the development process has been achieved over the years. The study is mainly descriptive as we explain the development process at UCSC which can be seen as a conveyor belt production of course material, but we also analyze the benefits and disadvantages this approach results in. Findings show that benefits of this approach are a high production of material and the model has also proved to be both time and cost effective. To further speed up the production the development process is highly dependent on templates, e.g. flash templates for learning activities and SCORM templates to design course and lesson structures. The use of templates to speed up the productions does, however, pose a disadvantage as there is a low degree of variety in activities in the produced material. Because of this the content does not fully support the pedagogy strived for in the eBIT program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reading, UK: Academic Conferences Limited, 2009. 406-412 p.
Keyword [en]
e-learning, content development, learning objects, templates, Sri Lanka
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-33396ISBN: 978-1-906638-52-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-33396DiVA: diva2:283078
Conference
8th European Conference on e-Learning (ECEL), 29-30 October, Bari, Italy
Available from: 2009-12-23 Created: 2009-12-23 Last updated: 2014-11-13Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Education for All in Sri Lanka: ICT4D Hubs for Region-Wide Dissemination of Blended Learning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education for All in Sri Lanka: ICT4D Hubs for Region-Wide Dissemination of Blended Learning
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

ICT4D, here defined as the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in developing regions, can be seen as one of the most powerful and cost efficient ways to improve the standard of living in the developing world. Many regions in Asia have shown a rapid but heterogeneous development where information technology had a drastic impact on development but often with the problems related to ICT4D 1.0: lack of sustainability and lack of scalability.

This study analysed the Sri Lankan infrastructure for region-wide dissemination of blended learning in the 21st century based on the exploration of some selected ICT4D hubs and educational initiatives. The overall aim of the research was to observe, describe and analyse how the selected ICT4D initiatives and the creation of ICT4D hubs in Sri Lanka might support region-wide dissemination of blended learning and local development. A longitudinal case study has been the overall approach where a number of embedded thematic units were explored in long-term fieldwork conducted between 2006 and 2012. Data has been collected from a combination of observations, interviews, group discussions, surveys and document analysis.

Findings showed that several of the studied ICT4D hubs have contributed to the general development but the country’s internal digital divide has in fact grown, as urban growth has been so much faster than the growth in rural areas, leaving the country with geographic as well as socio-economic gaps. Some of the former war zones have definitely been left behind and there is a need for further support of the Eastern and Northern regions of the island. Sri Lanka has had an outcome that must be classified as better than average compared to other developing regions with increased opportunities for education and with some ICT4D hubs as multipurpose meeting points. Contributing factors to the successful development are the high literacy rate, the chain of ICT4D projects rolled out in the right order and a committed implementation of educational eServices. On the other hand there were other, more negative findings indicating that sustainability, knowledge sharing and inter-project cooperation and coordination have often failed.

The identified strength in the Sri Lankan model, which can be recommended for other parts of the world as well, is the way top-down management of infrastructure sometimes is combined with bottom-up grass-root activities. Other recommendations, that also are global, are to extend existing ICT4D hubs and upgrade them to more intelligent, autonomous and multi-service ICT4D routers that could also handle the future need for eServices in the fields of eHealth, eFarming and eGovernance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, 2014. 120 p.
Series
Report Series / Department of Computer & Systems Sciences, ISSN 1101-8526 ; 14-017
Keyword
ICT4D, ICT4D hubs, Digital divide, Sri Lanka, Blended learning, Education for All
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-109061 (URN)978-91-7649-042-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-12-11, Lilla hörsalen, NOD-huset, Borgarfjordsgatan 12, Kista, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2014-11-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

http://daisy.dsv.su.se/fil/visa?id=27759

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mozelius, Peter
By organisation
Department of Computer and Systems Sciences
Information Systems

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 49 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf