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Essays on Social Reproduction and Lifelong Learning
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. (LNU)
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis consists of four self-contained papers that deal with social reproduction and lifelong learning in Sweden and all use large-scale longitudinal data from public registers.

The first paper analyses inequality by class origin in programme choice at university. It is found that individuals of working class origin choose programs of shorter duration with lower grade point requirements closer to their parents’ home compared to individuals of higher class origin. Children of the higher class instead prefer programs with higher expected earnings and avoid non-traditional institutions. This inequality leads to non-negligible differences in expected labour market outcomes further on.

 The second paper examines the wage gap between individuals of working and higher class origin, given education. By using an unusually detailed measure of education, the net wage gap between classes is found to be considerably smaller compared to standard specifications. The wage gap is found to be relatively small in the public sector, and also somewhat smaller in large compared to small private firms, suggesting that bureaucracy may act as a leveller.

The third paper investigates the relation between economic inequality and the decision to take up studies at the tertiary level late in life. The results show the likelihood of a late entry to be especially high for individuals who are disadvantaged to a moderate extent in terms of current earnings rank and also had some unemployment experience.

The fourth paper addresses life-long learning in tertiary education and its economic returns. Matching techniques are combined with panel data methods to account for non-random selection. The results reveal average positive returns of considerable magnitude on late degrees; between 10 to 20 percentiles in the earnings distribution. The largest effects are found in the lower parts of the earnings distribution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI), Stockholm University , 2010. , 36 p.
Series
Swedish Institute for Social Research, ISSN 0283-8222 ; 80
Keyword [en]
class inequality, social stratification, educational choice, lifelong learning, returns on education
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-37315ISBN: 978-91-7447-017-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-37315DiVA: diva2:303980
Public defence
2010-04-23, Nordenskiöldsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Manuscript. Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.Available from: 2010-03-31 Created: 2010-02-22 Last updated: 2012-01-17Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. The Structure of Educational Decision-making and Consequences for Inequality: A Swedish Test Case
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Structure of Educational Decision-making and Consequences for Inequality: A Swedish Test Case
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Inequality in educational attainment by class background arises because of differences in achievement or in decision making. A unique Swedish population level database on university applications and individuals’ rank of different programs is used to analyze class differences in preferences for different program characteristics using a rank order logit estimator. Compared to individuals from service class backgrounds, individuals from manual labor class backgrounds choose programs of shorter duration with lower grade point requirements closer to their parents’ home. Children from the service class instead prefer programs with higher expected earnings and avoid non-traditional institutions. Taken together, the differences in degree choice lead to non-neglible differences in expected earnings levels and expected unemployment risks further on.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-37312 (URN)
Available from: 2010-02-22 Created: 2010-02-22 Last updated: 2010-03-16
2. The Class-Origin Wage Gap Revisited: Supply and Demand Factors
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Class-Origin Wage Gap Revisited: Supply and Demand Factors
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The wage gap between individuals of advantaged and disadvantaged class origin is analysed using unique population-level matched employer employee data from Sweden. Using an unusually detailed measure of education, the remaining wage gap is considerably smaller compared to standard specifications. The wage gap is also influenced by geographic segregation. The wage gap varies considerably across industries and occupations, and the reasons for this are discussed. It is small in the public sector, and also smaller in large compared to small private firms, suggesting that bureaucracy may act as a leveller.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-37311 (URN)
Available from: 2010-02-22 Created: 2010-02-22 Last updated: 2010-03-16
3. Late Entry in Swedish Tertiary Education: Can the Opportunity of Lifelong Learning Promote Equality Over the Life Course?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Late Entry in Swedish Tertiary Education: Can the Opportunity of Lifelong Learning Promote Equality Over the Life Course?
2011 (English)In: British Journal of Industrial Relations, ISSN 0007-1080, E-ISSN 1467-8543, Vol. 49, no 3, 537-559 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, I investigate the relation between economic inequality and the decision to take up studies at the tertiary level late in life. Who exactly decides to enrol? Is it advantaged or disadvantaged groups in terms of current earnings rank, occupation, unemployment experience and social origin? Using unique register data of university applications and discrete time hazard regression models, the results show the likelihood of a late entry to be especially high for individuals who are disadvantaged to a moderate extent in terms of current earnings rank and also with some unemployment experience. Class differences in the transition to tertiary education decline with age. This suggests, with a moderate amount of simplification, that lifelong learning tends to promote both intra- and intergenerational equality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics, 2011
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-60099 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-8543.2010.00784.x (DOI)000293517000006 ()
Available from: 2011-08-08 Created: 2011-08-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
4. Is It Ever Too Late to Study?  The Economic Returns on Late Tertiary Degrees in Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is It Ever Too Late to Study?  The Economic Returns on Late Tertiary Degrees in Sweden
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper addresses lifelong learning in tertiary education and its economic returns. Swedish tertiary education is open to older students, and labor market legislation supports employees who take a leave to study. The longitudinal data used for this analysis is based on annual population level registers from 1985 to 2003. Matching techniques are combined with panel data methods to account for non-random selection. Late degrees were found to increase the earnings rank by 15 percentiles on average. The largest effects were found in the lower parts of the earnings distribution.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-37314 (URN)
Available from: 2010-02-22 Created: 2010-02-22 Last updated: 2010-03-16Bibliographically approved

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