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Effects of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on the bacterial community structure and degradation of pyrene in marine sediment
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
2008 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 90, no 3, 223-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ecological consequences of antibiotics in the aquatic environment have been an issue of concern over the past years due to the potential risk for negative effects on indigenous microorganisms. Microorganisms provide important ecosystem services, such as nutrient recycling, organic matter mineralization and degradation of pollutants. In this study, effects of exposure to the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on the bacterial diversity and pollutant degradation in natural marine sediments were studied using molecular methods (T-RFLP) in combination with radiorespirometry. In a microcosm experiment, sediment spiked with (14)C-labelled pyrene was exposed to five concentrations of ciprofloxacin (0, 20, 200, 1000 and 2000 microgL(-1)) in a single dose to the overlying water. The production of (14)CO(2) (i.e. complete mineralization of pyrene) was measured during 11 weeks. Sediment samples for bacterial community structure analysis were taken after 7 weeks. Results showed a significant dose-dependent inhibition of pyrene mineralization measured as the total (14)CO(2) production. The nominal EC(50) was calculated to 560 microgL(-1), corresponding to 0.4 microg/kg d.w. sediment. The lowest effect concentration on the bacterial community structure was 200 microgL(-1), which corresponds to 0.1 microg/kg d.w. sediment. Our results show that antibiotic pollution can be a potential threat to both bacterial diversity and an essential ecosystem service they perform in marine sediment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 90, no 3, 223-7 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-38891DOI: 10.1016/j.aquatox.2008.09.002ISI: 000261776000008PubMedID: 18930559OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-38891DiVA: diva2:317273
Available from: 2010-05-03 Created: 2010-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The importance of biodiversity for ecosystem processes in sediments: experimental examples from the Baltic Sea
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of biodiversity for ecosystem processes in sediments: experimental examples from the Baltic Sea
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Betydelsen av biologisk mångfald för ekosystemprocesser i sediment : experimentella exempel från Östersjön
Abstract [en]

Aquatic sediments are, by surface, the largest habitat on Earth. A wide diversity of organisms inhabit these sediments and by their actions they have a large influence on and also mediate many ecosystem processes. Several of these processes, such as decomposition and remineralisation of organic matter are important on a global scale and are essential to sustain life on Earth. The main aim of this thesis was to use an experimental ecosystem ecology approach in order to study some of these ecosystem processes in marine sediments and how they are linked to biodiversity.

Paper I and II found that an increased species richness of sediment deposit feeders increases the processing of organic matter from phytoplankton settled on the sea-floor, and that species-rich communities have a more efficient resource utilization of deposited organic matter. The results in paper IV and V also suggest that there is a link between microbial diversity in sediments and the degradation of organic contaminants. Paper V also shows that antibiotic pollution is a potential threat to natural microbial diversity and microbially mediated ecosystem services. The introduction of invasive species to ecosystems is another major threat to biodiversity and was studied in Paper II and III, by investigating the ecology of Marenzelleria arctia, a polychaete worm recently introduced in the Baltic Sea. Paper II suggests that M. arctia mainly utilize food resources not used by native deposit feeders, thus potentially increasing the benthic production in the Baltic Sea by increasing resource use efficiency. Paper III, however, show that M. arctia is protected from predation by the native benthic invertebrate predators, due to its ability to burrow deep in the sediment, suggesting that predation on M. arctia by higher trophic levels is restricted, thereby limiting trophic transfer.

In conclusion, this thesis gives some examples of the importance of marine biodiversity for the generation of a few key ecosystem processes, such as organic matter processing and the degradation of harmful contaminants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, 2010. 37 p.
Keyword
Biodiversity, Soft-bottom sediment, Ecosystem processes, Ecosystem function, Benthic-pelagic coupling, Baltic Sea, Trophic interactions, Pollutant biodegradation, Organic matter mineralization, Deposit feeder, Detritivore, Invasive species
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Marine Ecotoxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-38893 (URN)978-91-7447-087-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-06-04, Nordenskiöldsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: In press. Available from: 2010-05-11 Created: 2010-05-03 Last updated: 2010-05-05Bibliographically approved

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