Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Microtopographic influence on recolonization patterns of forest floor bryophytes following clear-cut logging
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The extent to which a plant assemblage might recolonize a disturbed system is in general related to the availability of propagule sources and sites with appropriate conditions for establishment. Both of these factors might be sensitive to aspects of spatial heterogeneity. Microtopographic variation may enhance initial resistance by reducing the impact of the disturbance and facilitate establishment of incoming propagules by providing shaded “safe-sites” for establishment. This study explores the influence of microtopographic heterogeneity (caused by variation in surface boulder cover) on the recolonization of closed-canopy forest floor bryophytes using a chronosequence of 75 spruce-dominated forests in south-central Sweden (2-163 years after clear-cutting). We found that high boulder cover did increase survival and subsequent persistence in young forests at the scale of 1000 m2, but that this effect disappeared on a smaller spatial scale (100 m2). At the smaller scale there was a steady accumulation of species over time in both sites with few and many boulders. Furthermore, species accumulation in boulder-poor subplots was not different when surrounded by boulder-rich compared with boulder-poor subplots suggesting short-distance recolonization from boulder-created refugia to be of little importance during the recolonization process. Apparently, boulders function as creators of refugia, but such events seem to be relatively infrequent, which can explain why we were only able to detect such a pattern at larger scales. To conclude it seems like boulders (and probably microtopographic surface structures in general) increase initial resistance to clear-cutting for this bryophyte guild, but that the subsequent recolonization process is more likely to depend on external propagule sources and factors affecting establishment such as microclimate.

Keyword [en]
boreal forest, boulders, bryophytes, clear-cutting, microtopography, refugia, resistance, scale
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Plant Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-38898OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-38898DiVA: diva2:317321
Available from: 2010-05-03 Created: 2010-05-03 Last updated: 2010-05-03Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Resistance and recolonization of bryophyte assemblages following disturbances: - detecting patterns and exploring mechanisms
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resistance and recolonization of bryophyte assemblages following disturbances: - detecting patterns and exploring mechanisms
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Disturbances are ubiquitous features of most northern forest ecosystems. The subsequent response of plant assemblages on both short (resistance or not) and long term (recolonization or not) will depend on a number of factors operating at several spatial scales. In boreal forest ecosystems, bryophyte assemblages are a conspicuous and species rich group of plants for which these processes are poorly understood. Using a combination of experimental and observational approaches this thesis explores these questions for closed-canopy bryophyte assemblages in relation to a) microtopography (both for the initial and long-term response), b) environmental constrains during post-logging succession and c) disturbance type. My results clearly show that the shade and shelter provided by microtopographic surface structures can increase survival rates of bryophytes following clear-cut logging by decreasing mortality from microclimatic stress and mechanical disturbance. Following clear-cutting, the recovery of forest floor and dead wood living bryophytes seems to be a relatively steady and progressive process without any major bottleneck episodes in the young or semi-mature forest stages with much of the pre-disturbance composition recovered after 50 years. Although boulders were found to increase the initial survival on clear-cuts and hence increase disturbance resistance, we found no evidence that boulders influenced the subsequent recolonization process. Lastly, strong compositional dissimilarities were found in young forests (40 years) following clear-cut logging, wildfire and insect outbreak, indicating divergent trajectories to occur following different disturbances. Hence, early seral stages of forest ecosystems regenerating after natural disturbances seem to compliment young managed forests in maintaining landscape level diversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Botany, Stockholm University, 2010. 30 p.
Keyword
Bryophytes, boreal forest, boulders, clear-cutting, disturbance, establishment, insect outbreaks, microtopography, recolonization, resistance, spatial heterogeneity, succession, wildfires
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Plant Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-38883 (URN)978-91-7447-053-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-06-04, Föreläsningssalen, Botanicum, Lilla Frescativägen 5, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Submitted. Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.Available from: 2010-05-11 Created: 2010-05-03 Last updated: 2010-05-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Schmalholz, MartinHylander, Kristoffer
By organisation
Department of Botany
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 33 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf