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Is body size at birth related to circadian salivary cortisol levels in adulthood?: Results from a longitudinal cohort study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
2010 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, 346- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The hypothesis of fetal origins of adult disease has during the last decades received interest as an explanation of chronic, e.g. cardiovascular, disease in adulthood stemming from fetal environmental conditions. Early programming and enduring dysregulations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis), with cortisol as its end product, has been proposed as a possible mechanism by which birth weight influence later health status. However, the fetal origin of the adult cortisol regulation has been insufficiently studied. The present study aims to examine if body size at birth is related to circadian cortisol levels at 43 years. METHODS: Participants were drawn from a prospective cohort study (n = 752, 74.5%). Salivary cortisol samples were collected at four times during one day at 43 years, and information on birth size was collected retrospectively from delivery records. Information on body mass during adolescence and adulthood and on health behavior, medication and medical conditions at 43 years was collected prospectively by questionnaire and examined as potential confounders. Participants born preterm or < 2500 g were excluded from the main analyses. RESULTS: Across the normal spectrum, size at birth (birth weight and ponderal index) was positively related to total (area under the curve, AUC) and bedtime cortisol levels in the total sample. Results were more consistent in men than in women. Descriptively, participants born preterm or < 2500 g also seemed to display elevated evening and total cortisol levels. No associations were found for birth length or for the cortisol awakening response (CAR). CONCLUSIONS: These results are contradictory to previously reported negative associations between birth weight and adult cortisol levels, and thus tentatively question the assumption that only low birth weight predicts future physiological dysregulations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 10, 346- p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-42151DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-346ISI: 000281848100001PubMedID: 20553630Local ID: P2811OAI: diva2:344181
Available from: 2010-08-18 Created: 2010-08-18 Last updated: 2011-11-23Bibliographically approved

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Theorell, Töres
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