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Hydro-climatic trends and water resource management implications based on multi-scale data for the Lake Victoria region, Kenya
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
2010 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 5, no 3, 034005- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unreliable rainfall may be a main cause of poverty in rural areas, such as the Kisumu district byLake Victoria in Kenya. Climate change may further increase the negative effects of rainfalluncertainty. These effects could be mitigated to some extent through improved and adaptive water resource management and planning, which relies on our interpretations and projections of the coupled hydro-climatic system behaviour and its development trends. In order to identify and quantify the main differences and consistencies among such hydro-climatic assessments, this study investigates trends and exemplifies their use for important water management decisions for the Lake Victoria drainage basin (LVDB), based on local scale data for the Orongovillage in the Kisumu district, and regional scale data for the whole LVDB. Results show low correlation between locally and regionally observed hydro-climatic trends, and large differences, which in turn affects assessments of important water resource management parameters. However, both data scales converge in indicating that observed local and regional hydrological discharge trends are primarily driven by local and regional water use and land use changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 5, no 3, 034005- p.
Keyword [en]
Lake Victoria, Kenya, hydrology, water resource management, irrigation, climate change, hydro-climatic interaction
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-42327DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/5/3/034005ISI: 000282273700006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-42327DiVA: diva2:345219
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Destouni, GeorgiaJarsjö, JerkerLyon, Steve W.
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