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Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders
Virginia Tech University, Department of Psychology, Child Study Center, 460 Turner St., Suite 207, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Virginia Tech University, Department of Psychology, Child Study Center, 460 Turner St., Suite 207, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA.
2010 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 48, no 9, 827-831 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment onspecific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorderson treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and “other” types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician severity ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disordersdid not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2010. Vol. 48, no 9, 827-831 p.
Keyword [en]
comorbidity, specific phobias, anxiety disorders, one-session treatment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-47029DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2010.05.024OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-47029DiVA: diva2:372680
Note
This study was funded in part by the National Institute of Mental Health Grant R01 51 308 to Thomas H. Ollendick (PI) and Lars-Göran Öst (Co-PI).Available from: 2010-11-26 Created: 2010-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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