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MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN LANDLOCKED ARCTIC CHAR (SALVELINUS ALPINUS) FROM THE CANADIAN ARCTIC. PART I: INSIGHTS FROM TROPHIC RELATIONSHIPS IN 18 LAKES
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
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2010 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 29, no 3, 621-632 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concentrations of mercury (Hg) have increased slowly in landlocked Arctic char over a 10- to 15-year period in the Arctic. Fluxes of Hg to sediments also show increases in most Arctic lakes. Correlation of Hg with trophic level (TL) was used to investigate and compare biomagnification of Hg in food webs from lakes in the Canadian Arctic sampled from 2002 to 2007. Concentrations of Hg (total Hg and methylmercury [MeHg]) in food webs were compared across longitudinal and latitudinal gradients in relation to delta C-13 and delta N-15 in periphyton, zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and Arctic char of varying size-classes. Trophic magnification factors (TMFs) were calculated for the food web in each lake and related to available physical and chemical characteristics of the lakes. The relative content of MeHg increased with trophic level from 4.3 to 12.2% in periphyton, 41 to 79% in zooplankton, 59 to 72% in insects, and 74 to 100% in juvenile and adult char. The delta C-13 signatures of adult char indicated coupling with benthic invertebrates. Cannibalism among char lengthened the food chain. Biomagnification was confirmed in all 18 lakes, with TMFs ranging from 3.5 +/- 1.1 to 64.3 +/- 0.8. Results indicate that TMFs and food chain length (FCL) are key factors in explaining interlake variability in biomagnification of [Hg] among different lakes. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010; 29: 621-632. (C) 2009 SETAC

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 29, no 3, 621-632 p.
Keyword [en]
Mercury, Arctic char, Biomagnification, Food chain length, Climate change
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Natural Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-50287DOI: 10.1002/etc.95ISI: 000275368600020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-50287DiVA: diva2:381560
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authorCount :9Available from: 2010-12-28 Created: 2010-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Meili, MarkusBorg, HansSundbom, Marcus
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