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Risky neighbourhood or individuals at risk? The significance of neighbourhood conditions for violent victimisation in residential areas
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
2007 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 8, 2-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study is to examine the social determinants of violent victimization, with the principal focus being directed at the significance of neighbourhood conditions. By combining data from victim surveys with information on the neighbourhoods in which the survey respondents live, we have been able to study both the individual and household characteristics, and also the factors specific to different neighbourhoods that are associated with violent victimization. What we are able to show is that the violence that occurs in the residential neighbourhood constitutes only a small fraction of the violent incidents to which people are exposed. Further, the violence that occurs within the neighbourhood takes place to a large extent within the victim’s home. This suggests that exposure to violence is associated with neighbourhood conditions only to a limited extent. More detailed analyses of the violence that does occur within the neighbourhood show no effects of neighbourhood conditions when controls are included for individual and household characteristics. The conclusion, therefore, is that we are unable to find any clear neighbourhood effects in relation to violent victimization. The differences that we  initially note between different types of neighbourhood in the proportions reporting exposure to violence are too a large degree the result of selection processes. These do not, however, in themselves increase the risk for violent victimization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 8, 2-21 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-52305OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-52305DiVA: diva2:386988
Available from: 2011-01-13 Created: 2011-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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