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Fetal, developmental, and parental influences on cystatin C in childhood: the Uppsala Family Study
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2011 (English)In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, ISSN 0272-6386, E-ISSN 1523-6838, Vol. 57, no 6, 863-872 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim was to identify determinants (biomedical and social characteristics of children and their parents) of cystatin C levels in healthy children drawn from a population sample.

Study Design: Cross-sectional study.

Setting& Participants: 425 pairs of consecutive full siblings born 1987-1995 in Uppsala were identified using the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and invited with their parents for examination in 2000-2001.

Outcome: Serum cystatin C level was log-transformed and analyzed using random-effects models.

Measurements: The examination in parents and children consisted of a nonfasting blood sample, anthropometry, and questionnaires about lifestyle and socioeconomic position. Tanner stage was used for assessment of pubertal status.

Results: In age-, height-, and body mass index-adjusted analyses, cystatin C level increased by 2.6% (95% CI, 0.3%-4.8%) higher in Tanner stage 2 vs 1 girls, and 1.6% (95%CI, 0.2%-3.1%) lower in boys than girls. For every 10% increase in maternal cystatin C level, offspring cystatin C level increased by 3.0% (95% CI, 2.2%-3.8%); the equivalent effect for paternal cystatin C level was 2.1% (95% CI, 1.3%-2.9%). Lower maternal education was associated with a 2.4% (95% CI, 0.3%-4.6%) higher cystatin C level in their offspring.Limitations: Cross-sectional study design, missing cystatin C values for subset of parents, lack of urinary measurements, no gold-standard measurement of glomerular filtration rate.

Conclusions: There are intergenerational associations of cystatin C level in families in line with previous reports of heritability of kidney disease. Lower maternal education is associated with higher cystatin C levels in their children. Further studies of healthy children are needed to explore the biological mechanisms for these findings. If cystatin C is measured, these studies will need to record pubertal stages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 57, no 6, 863-872 p.
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Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-55700DOI: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2010.12.025ISI: 000290788400011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-55700DiVA: diva2:406322
Available from: 2011-03-25 Created: 2011-03-25 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Koupil, Ilona
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