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Association between use of sedatives or hypnotics, alcohol consumption, or other risk factors and a single injurious fall or multiple falls: a longitudinal general population study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
2002 (English)In: Alcohol, ISSN 0741-8329, E-ISSN 1873-6823, Vol. 28, no 1, 9-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we investigated the association between risk factors, including use of sedatives or hypnotics or alcohol consumption, and injurious falls leading to hospitalization or death among 4023 subjects (1828 men and 2195 women) aged 20-89 years in Stockholm County, Sweden. Questionnaire data obtained from the 1984-1985 Stockholm Health of the Population Study (SHPS) were linked to official data registers on hospitalization and mortality. Of the 4023 subjects, 330 (121 men and 209 women) had been treated for or died of injurious falls during the 12-year follow-up period. High age was significantly associated with injurious falls among both men and women. Multivariate analyses showed that women who had used sedatives or hypnotics during the 2 weeks before an injurious fall were at increased risk [relative risk of 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.06)] for two or more injurious falls, but not for a single fall accident. High alcohol consumption and earlier self-reported injurious falls were significantly associated with injurious falls for women younger than 60 years of age and with earlier self-reported falls and living alone for men in the same age category. Among older women (>60 years of age), high alcohol consumption and use of sedatives or hypnotics were significantly associated with injurious falls, whereas living alone and earlier self-reported accidents were significant predictors for men in the same age category. These results support a cautious prescribing policy for sedatives and hypnotics, as well as an awareness of high alcohol consumption and its association with injurious falls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 28, no 1, 9-16 p.
Keyword [en]
Injurious falls, Alcohol, Benzodiazepines, Injuries, Longitudinal studies, Risk factors
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-57151DOI: 10.1016/S0741-8329(02)00223-9ISI: 000177935100002PubMedID: 12377356OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-57151DiVA: diva2:414367
Available from: 2011-05-03 Created: 2011-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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