Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A population study of the association between hospitalisation for alcoholism among employed in different socio-economic classes and the risk of mobility out of or within the working force
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
2004 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 14, no 1, 53-57 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Alcohol problems can increase the risk of downward mobility within, or mobility out of, the workforce. The magnitude of this risk has been unclear, as has also been the question whether the risk is different for men and women, for different socio-economic classes, and for single-living compared with co-habiting people. METHODS: The study period was 1970-1980, when unemployment was low in Sweden. Information about socio-economic status from censuses was linked to hospitalization for alcoholism, alcohol psychosis and alcohol intoxication (AAA) over the period 1970-1975 in Stockholm County in persons aged 20-49 years in 1970 and gainfully employed in the same socio-economic category in both 1970 and 1975, and to general population data. The standardized rate ratio for mobility out of the workforce and for downward socio-economic mobility was calculated for those hospitalized with AAA. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant risk of mobility out of the workforce over the period 1976-1980 in both sexes and in all socio-economic groups. The relative risk was 6.63 for male skilled and semi-skilled manual workers and 9.52 for non-manual employees at medium and high level, while the corresponding figures were lower for women. The absolute risk of leaving the workforce was lowest in non-manual employees at medium and high level. The relative risk was reduced in persons who were co-habiting. CONCLUSIONS: Severe alcohol problems are powerful determinants of downward mobility within, or mobility out of, the workforce in both sexes and in all socio-economic categories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 14, no 1, 53-57 p.
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-58805PubMedID: 15080392OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-58805DiVA: diva2:422457
Available from: 2011-06-13 Created: 2011-06-13 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

PubMed
By organisation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD)
In the same journal
European Journal of Public Health
Social Work

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 33 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf