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Conflicts at Work - The Relationship with Workplace Factors, Work Characteristics and Self-rated Health
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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2011 (English)In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 49, no 4, 501-510 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few studies have considered the work environment in relation to workplace conflicts and those who have been published have included relatively few psychosocial work environment factors. Little research has been published on the consequences of workplace conflicts in terms of employee health. In this study, the statistical relationships between work and workplace characteristics on one hand and conflicts on the other hand are examined. In addition, the relationship between conflicts at work and self-rated health are described. The study population was derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) 2006; n=5,141. Among employees at workplaces with more than 20 employees (n=3,341), 1,126 (33.7%) responded that they had been involved in some type of conflict during the two years preceding the survey. Among the work and workplace characteristics studied, the following factors were independently associated with increased likelihood of ongoing conflicts: Conflicting demands, emotional demands, risk of transfer or dismissal, poor promotion prospects, high level of employee influence and good freedom of expression. Factors that decreased the likelihood of ongoing conflicts were: Good resources, good relations with management, good confidence in management, good procedural justice (fairness of decisions) and good social support. After adjustment for socioeconomic conditions the odds ratio for low self-rated health associated with ongoing conflict at work was 2.09 (1.60-2.74). The results provide a good starting point for intervention and prevention work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 49, no 4, 501-510 p.
Keyword [en]
Conflicts, Work, Work environment, Workplace factors, Work characteristics, Self-rated health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-60407ISI: 000293313000013PubMedID: 21697618Local ID: P2867OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-60407DiVA: diva2:434747
Available from: 2011-08-16 Created: 2011-08-16 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Oxenstierna, GabrielMagnusson Hanson, Linda L.Stenfors, CeciliaElofsson, StigTheorell, Töres
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Stress Research InstituteDepartment of Social Work
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Industrial Health
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