Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Attaining Authority: Cross-National Variation in the Gender Gap in High Authority Positions
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Authority positions commonly bring with them significant types of power, for example, influence over setting wages and granting promotions. Hence, equal access for men and women to such positions is of considerable importance. Although Nordic countries are typically depicted as the most gender equal in the world, several studies suggest that they rank low relative to other industrial countries with respect to gender equality in positions of workplace authority and women’s chances of obtaining the highest white-collar jobs. The aim of this paper is to study the extent to which women’s opportunities to attain positions of high labour market authority is associated with maternal employment policies, such as paid parental leave and part-time work. The analyses were conducted using cross-sectional data from the 2005 and 2006 European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for 25 countries. The results showed that a high proportion of women working long part-time hours was related to larger gender differences in the attainment of high authority positions, which disadvantaged women. However, there was no association between paid parental leave and the gender gap in positions of workplace authority.

Keyword [en]
authority, gender differences, paid parental leave, female part-time work
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-62073OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-62073DiVA: diva2:439726
Available from: 2011-09-08 Created: 2011-09-08 Last updated: 2011-09-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. What's Sex Got to Do with It? Women and Men in European Labour Markets
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What's Sex Got to Do with It? Women and Men in European Labour Markets
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis consists of four empirical studies on women and men in European labour markets.

Study I examines effects of the sex of the immediate supervisor on the time men and women spend in initial on-the-job training (OJT) in Sweden. The results show that men receive longer initial OJT than women do, but men’s time in training is independent of the supervisor’s sex. For women in the private sector, the chances of receiving long initial OJT are higher if the immediate supervisor is a man.

Study II analyses effects of labour market institutions on the quality of part-time work by comparing the skills and autonomy of female part-time jobs in Britain and Sweden. The results show that female part-time employees in Sweden hold positions of higher skill and have more autonomy compared to their equivalents in Britain. Both British and Swedish part-time employees face relative disadvantages when compared to female full-time workers.

Study III examines associations between maternal employment policies and wage penalties for mothers by skill in 10 European countries. The results indicate that, net of variation in female labour force participation, extensive publicly funded childcare is associated with a modest decrease in the motherhood wage penalty, regardless of skill. By contrast, paid maternity leave is weakly associated with a larger motherhood wage gap in less skilled jobs only.

Study IV examines the extent to which women’s opportunities to attain positions of high workplace authority are related to maternal employment policies, such as paid parental leave and part-time work. Based on data from 25 European countries, the results show that a high proportion of women working long part-time hours is associated with a wider gender gap in the attainment of high authority positions, to the disadvantage of women. However, paid parental leave appears to be unrelated to the gender authority gap.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, 2011. 36 p.
Series
Swedish Institute for Social Research, ISSN 0283-8222 ; 85
Keyword
gender inequality, labour market, country comparisons, skills, work-family balance, part-time, maternity/parental leave, childcare, family policy, Sweden, Europe
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-61877 (URN)978-91-7447-329-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-09-30, De Geersalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 14, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Manuscript. Paper 2: In press. Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.Available from: 2011-09-08 Created: 2011-09-01 Last updated: 2012-02-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Halldén, Karin
By organisation
The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI)
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf