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Affected by Smells?: Environmental Chemical Responsivity Predicts Odor Perception
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
2011 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 36, no 7, 641-648 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Strong negative reactions, physical symptoms, and behavioral disruptions due to environmental odors are common in the adult population. We investigated relationships among such environmental chemosensory responsivity (CR), personality traits, affective states, and odor perception. Study 1 showed that CR and neuroticism were positively correlated in a sample of young adults (n = 101), suggesting that persons high in neuroticism respond more negatively to environmental odors. Study 2 explored the relationships among CR, noise responsivity (NR), neuroticism, and odor perception (i.e., pleasantness and intensity) in a subset of participants (n = 40). High CR was associated with high NR. Regression analyses indicated that high CR predicted higher odor intensity ratings and low olfactory threshold (high sensitivity) predicted lower pleasantness ratings. However, neuroticism was not directly associated with odor ratings or thresholds. Overall, the results suggest that CR and odor thresholds predict perceptual ratings of odors and that high CR is associated with nonchemosensory affective traits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2011. Vol. 36, no 7, 641-648 p.
Keyword [en]
affect, chemical sensitivity scale, neuroticism, olfaction, perception, personality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-62125DOI: 10.1093/chemse/bjr028ISI: 000293913300007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-62125DiVA: diva2:439892
Note

The study was supported by a research grant from the Stockholm Brain Institute. We thank the Department of Organic Chemistry, Stockholm University, for generously donating odors used in Study 2, and Claes Palm for excellent assistance in data collection.

Available from: 2011-09-09 Created: 2011-09-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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