Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Reconnecting to the biosphere
Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 22
2011 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 7, 719-738 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humanity has emerged as a major force in the operation of the biosphere, with a significant imprint on the Earth System, challenging social-ecological resilience. This new situation calls for a fundamental shift in perspectives, world views, and institutions. Human development and progress must be reconnected to the capacity of the biosphere and essential ecosystem services to be sustained. Governance challenges include a highly interconnected and faster world, cascading social-ecological interactions and planetary boundaries that create vulnerabilities but also opportunities for social-ecological change and transformation. Tipping points and thresholds highlight the importance of understanding and managing resilience. New modes of flexible governance are emerging. A central challenge is to reconnect these efforts to the changing preconditions for societal development as active stewards of the Earth System. We suggest that the Millennium Development Goals need to be reframed in such a planetary stewardship context combined with a call for a new social contract on global sustainability. The ongoing mind shift in human relations with Earth and its boundaries provides exciting opportunities for societal development in collaboration with the biosphere-a global sustainability agenda for humanity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 40, no 7, 719-738 p.
Keyword [en]
Social-ecological systems, Resilience, Ecosystem services, Natural capital, Adaptive governance, Planetary stewardship
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-65147DOI: 10.1007/s13280-011-0184-yISI: 000298500100002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-65147DiVA: diva2:461286
Note

Special Section Issue: 3rd Nobel Laureate Symposium on Global Sustainability / Guest edited by Carl Folke and Johan Rockström

Available from: 2011-12-02 Created: 2011-12-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Folke, CarlRockström, JohanOlsson, PerEbbesson, JonasElmqvist, ThomasGalaz, VictorMoberg, FredrikNilsson, MånsÖsterblom, HenrikPersson, ÅsaPeterson, Garry
By organisation
Stockholm Resilience CentreStockholm Environment InstituteStockholm Environmental Law and Policy CentreDepartment of Systems EcologyBaltic Nest Institute
In the same journal
Ambio
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 166 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf