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Early colonization with a group of Lactobacilli decreases the risk for allergy at five years of age despite allergic heredity.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
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2011 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 8, e23031- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Microbial deprivation early in life can potentially influence immune mediated disease development such as allergy. The aims of this study were to investigate the influence of parental allergy on the infant gut colonization and associations between infant gut microbiota and allergic disease at five years of age.

METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fecal samples were collected from 58 infants, with allergic or non-allergic parents respectively, at one and two weeks as well as at one, two and twelve months of life. DNA was extracted from the fecal samples and Real time PCR, using species-specific primers, was used for detection of Bifidobacterium (B.) adolescentis, B. breve, B. bifidum, Clostridium (C.) difficile, a group of Lactobacilli (Lactobacillus (L.) casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus) as well as Staphylococcus (S.) aureus. Infants with non-allergic parents were more frequently colonized by Lactobacilli compared to infants with allergic parents (p = 0.014). However, non-allergic five-year olds acquired Lactobacilli more frequently during their first weeks of life, than their allergic counterparts, irrespectively of parental allergy (p = 0.009, p = 0.028). Further the non-allergic children were colonized with Lactobacilli on more occasions during the first two months of life (p = 0.038). Also, significantly more non-allergic children were colonized with B. bifidum at one week of age than the children allergic at five years (p = 0.048).

CONCLUSION: In this study we show that heredity for allergy has an impact on the gut microbiota in infants but also that early Lactobacilli (L. casei, L. paracasei, L. rhamnosus) colonization seems to decrease the risk for allergy at five years of age despite allergic heredity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 6, no 8, e23031- p.
National Category
Immunology Biological Sciences
Research subject
Immunology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-65650DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0023031ISI: 000293511200031PubMedID: 21829685OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-65650DiVA: diva2:464360
Note

authorCount :5

Available from: 2011-12-13 Created: 2011-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Infant gut microbiota, immune responses and allergic disease during childhood
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infant gut microbiota, immune responses and allergic disease during childhood
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The early-life microbiota is important for postnatal immune maturation and implied in immune mediated diseases. The aim of this work was to study specific species of bacteria in the gut microbiota and relate them to immune function and allergic disease during childhood.

In paper I we investigated gut bacteria in feces from infants included in a prospective allergy cohort. We found that children with non-allergic parents were more likely to be colonized with a group of lactobacilli. Further, lactobacilli colonization was more prevalent in children remaining non-allergic, regardless of allergic heredity. In paper II we related the infant gut bacteria to immune function at two years of age. Infant Staphylococcus (S.) aureus colonization associated with increased immune responsiveness, whereas co-colonization with S. aureus and lactobacilli associated with reduced responses. In paper III we investigated T regulatory (Treg) cell phenotype and cytokine production during childhood, and related S. aureus and lactobacilli colonization to Treg phenotype at the age of two. The Treg population matured with age, regarding phenotype and cytokine production. Furthermore, infant S. aureus colonization associated with Treg phenotype at the age of two. In paper IV we investigated the in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cells responses to soluble factors produced by lactobacilli and S. aureus. Both T- and natural killer cells responded with cytokine production, degranulation and proliferation after S. aureus and simultaneous culture with lactobacilli could dampen the S. aureus-induced responses.

Taken together this thesis shows that the gut microbiota is altered in children who develop allergies, and that early life bacteria associate with immune function. Our in vitro findings support that lactobacilli modulate immune maturation and responses, and that early lactobacilli-colonization may be important for a properly regulated maturation of the immune system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, 2014. 82 p.
National Category
Immunology
Research subject
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-108425 (URN)978-91-7649-036-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-11-28, De Geersalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 14, 10:00 (English)
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Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2014-11-06 Created: 2014-10-23 Last updated: 2016-09-27Bibliographically approved

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