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Strategic navigation: in search of an adaptable mode of strategic spatial planning practice
Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
2011 (English)In: Town planning review, ISSN 0041-0020, E-ISSN 1478-341X, Vol. 82, no 5, 595-613 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In face of a dizzying pace of change, radical uncertainty and emergent policy effects there have been calls for more open, dynamic and adaptable alternatives to the modernist institutional legacy of strategic spatial planning practice. Here a case is explored where planners responsible for Melbourne's metropolitan planning sought to operationalise such an approach to strategic spatial planning following release of a new metropolitan strategy. They termed this approach 'strategic navigation'. Operationalisation of strategic navigation required: a reconceptualisation of the role of strategic planning; a codification of the subsequent organisational implications through the draft business planning process, including different priorities with respect to the knowledge and relationships, tools and practices that planners rely on to inform their situated judgement; and the identification and informal pursuit of leverageable strategies as a way to enact adaptability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 82, no 5, 595-613 p.
National Category
Physical Geography
Research subject
Natural Resources Management
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-66000DOI: 10.3828/tpr.2011.34OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-66000DiVA: diva2:466687
Available from: 2011-12-16 Created: 2011-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Social-ecological resilience and planning: an interdisciplinary exploration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social-ecological resilience and planning: an interdisciplinary exploration
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Despite considerable expansion in the scope and function of the state with respect to environmental protection, the world’s biological diversity and ecosystem services continue to deteriorate. Finding ways to better govern human-nature relations in cities is an important part of addressing this decline. The aim of this thesis is to explore the potential of social-ecological resilience to inform urban governance in theory and practice, through a focus on strategic spatial planning. Resilience has become an increasingly important urban policy discourse and much hope is placed in its potential to improve urban governance. However, there is an acknowledged gap between social-ecological resilience as an ideal and the ability to govern towards it in practice. At the time this doctoral research commenced there had been no engagement with social-ecological resilience in the planning theory literature and minimal engagement by empirical planning research. It is to this gap the thesis contributes. Social-ecological resilience scholarship is found to offer planning theory a partly new way of understanding complex human-nature relations. This is relevant to calls by planning theorists for more attention to matters of substance, including ecological processes. With respect to practice, planners see potential for social-ecological resilience to critically inform strategic spatial planning, including through the framing of problems, tools for analysis/synthesis and governance options. There are also however, lessons for social-ecological resilience scholarship that emerge from the detailed empirical research which suggests that attention to the politics of the everyday activities of administrators, elected officials, planning officials, conservationists and citizens operating within the so-called ‘mangle of practice’ is critical to explaining the gap between the ideal of governing for urban resilience, and what happens in practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, 2012. 31 p.
Keyword
social-ecological resilience, strategic spatial planning, urban governance, ecosystem services, Melbourne, Stockholm
National Category
Other Natural Sciences
Research subject
Natural Resources Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-78977 (URN)978-91-7447-554-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-09-26, Nordenskiöldsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 09:30 (English)
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Supervisors
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Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 4: Manuscript. Paper 5: Manuscript.

Available from: 2012-09-04 Created: 2012-08-22 Last updated: 2012-08-27Bibliographically approved

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