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Kinetic design of the respiratory oxidases
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 108, no 27, 11057-11062 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy conservation in all kingdoms of life involves electron transfer, through a number of membrane-bound proteins, associated with proton transfer across the membrane. In aerobic organisms, the last component of this electron-transfer chain is a respiratory heme-copper oxidase that catalyzes reduction of O(2) to H(2)O, linking this process to transmembrane proton pumping. So far, the molecular mechanism of proton pumping is not known for any system that is driven by electron transfer. Here, we show that this problem can be addressed and elucidated in a unique cytochrome c oxidase (cytochrome ba(3)) from a thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus. The results show that in this oxidase the electron-and proton-transfer reactions are orchestrated in time such that previously unresolved proton-transfer reactions could be directly observed. On the basis of these data we propose that loading of the proton pump occurs upon electron transfer, but before substrate proton transfer, to the catalytic site. Furthermore, the results suggest that the pump site alternates between a protonated and deprotonated state for every second electron transferred to the catalytic site, which would explain the noninteger pumping stoichiometry (0.5 H(+)/e(-)) of the ba(3) oxidase. Our studies of this variant of Nature's palette of mechanistic solutions to a basic problem offer a route toward understanding energy conservation in biological systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 108, no 27, 11057-11062 p.
Keyword [en]
rapid kinetics, membrane protein, electrochemical gradient
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-66579DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1104103108ISI: 000292376700032OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-66579DiVA: diva2:468618
Note
authorCount :4Available from: 2011-12-21 Created: 2011-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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