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Comparison of infant malaria incidence in districts of Maputo province, Mozambique
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Number of Authors: 2
2011 (English)In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 10, 93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Malaria is one of the principal health problems in Mozambique, representing 48% of total external consultations and 63% of paediatric hospital admissions in rural and general hospitals with 26.7% of total mortality. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for 90% of all infections being also the species associated with most severe cases. The aim of this study was to identify zones of high malaria risk, showing their spatially and temporal pattern. Methods: Space and time Poison model for the analysis of malaria data is proposed. This model allows for the inclusion of environmental factors: rainfall, temperature and humidity as predictor variables. Modelling and inference use the fully Bayesian approach via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation techniques. The methodology is applied to analyse paediatric data arising from districts of Maputo province, Mozambique, between 2007 and 2008. Results: Malaria incidence risk is greater for children in districts of Manhica, Matola and Magude. Rainfall and humidity are significant predictors of malaria incidence. The risk increased with rainfall (relative risk - RR: .006761, 95% interval: .001874, .01304), and humidity (RR: .049, 95% interval: .03048, .06531). Malaria incidence was found to be independent of temperature. Conclusions: The model revealed a spatial and temporal pattern of malaria incidence. These patterns were found to exhibit a stable malaria transmission in most non-coastal districts. The findings may be useful for malaria control, planning and management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 10, 93
National Category
Computer Sciences
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-68805DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-10-93ISI: 000290862800001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-68805DiVA: diva2:474597
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-07 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Mining Mozambique Health Data: The Case of Malaria: From Bayesian Incidence Risk to Incidence Case Predictions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mining Mozambique Health Data: The Case of Malaria: From Bayesian Incidence Risk to Incidence Case Predictions
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The health sector in Mozambique is piled with data, holding records of major public health diseases, such as malaria, cholera, etc. The process of scrutinizing such a mass of health data for useful information is challenging but essential for the health authorities and professionals. Statistical learning and inferential approaches can be used to provide health decision makers with appropriate tools for disease diagnosis and assessment, where the analysis is performed using Bayesian predictive techniques and data mining. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how predictive data mining and Bayesian regression methods can be used effectively, so as to extract useful knowledge from reported malaria health data to support decision making and management. 

In summary, effective Bayesian predictive methods based on spatial and space-time reported cases of malaria have been derived, allowing the extraction of the main risk factors for malaria. Predictive models that combine consecutive temporal connections within the analysis of the space-time variations of the disease have been found to be relevant when the explicit modeling of seasonality is not required or is even unfeasible.

Investigation of the most effective ways to derive numerical predictive models was performed using several regression predictive methods. The conclusions are that effective numerical prediction of new cases of the disease can be achieved by training support vector machines using a time-window approach for the choice of different training sets based on a number of years and reducing the time towards the test set. The best performance is obtained for a smaller time-window. Another contribution of this thesis is the determining of the importance of predictors in the prediction of the incidence of malaria, performed by adopting the permutation accuracy strategy (from the random forests method) using the test set. Also, an additional contribution relates to a significant reduction in the predictive error, which has been obtained by the employment of a sample correction bias strategy, while testing the predictive models in different regions, other than where they were initially developed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, 2015. 93 p.
Series
Report Series / Department of Computer & Systems Sciences, ISSN 1101-8526 ; 15-020
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-122672 (URN)978-91-7649-304-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-12-16, Aula NOD, NOD-huset, Borgarfjordsgtan 12, Kista, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-11-24 Created: 2015-11-08 Last updated: 2015-12-14Bibliographically approved

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