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Is the population level link between drinking and harm similar for women and men?: a time series analysis with focus on gender-specific drinking and alcohol-related hospitalizations in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
2011 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 21, no 4, 432-437 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A question that has not been addressed in the literature is whether the population level association between alcohol and harm differs between men and women. The main aim of this article is to fill this gap by analysing recently collected time series data of male and female self-reported drinking in relation to gender-specific harm indicators in Sweden. Methods: Male and female per capita and risk consumption was estimated on the basis of self-reported data from monthly alcohol surveys for the period 2002-07. Overall per capita consumption including recorded sales and estimates of unrecorded consumption were also collected for the same period. Alcohol-related hospitalizations were used as indicators of alcohol-related harm. Data were aggregated into quarterly observations and analysed by means of time series analyses (ARIMA-modelling). Results: Overall per capita consumption was significantly related to both male and female alcohol-related hospitalizations. Male per capita consumption and risk consumption were also significantly related to alcohol-related hospitalizations among men. Female per capita consumption and risk consumption had also a positive association with alcohol-related hospitalizations but statistical significance was only reached for alcohol poisonings where the association was even stronger than for men. Conclusions: Changes in alcohol consumption in Sweden was associated with changes in male and female alcohol-related hospitalizations also in analyses based on gender-specific consumption measures. There was no clear evidence that the population level association between alcohol and harm differed between men and women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 21, no 4, 432-437 p.
Keyword [en]
alcohol-related hospitalizations, gender-specific drinking, population drinking, time series analysis
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-69232DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckq096ISI: 000293025800010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-69232DiVA: diva2:476972
Note
authorCount :2Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-11 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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