Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Public sentiment towards alcohol and local government alcohol policies in New Zealand
University of Melbourne, School of Population Health.
2012 (English)In: International journal on drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 23, no 1, 45-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In many countries, including New Zealand, alcohol availability and promotion have increased markedly in the last three decades as a result of liberalised central and/or state government alcohol policies. Accordingly, communities are increasingly relying on local government to manage alcohol-related problems. New Zealand's Local Government Act (2002) states the purpose of local government as facilitating public decision-making and promoting community well-being. We sought to describe public sentiment towards alcohol and local government alcohol policies.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2007 with a sample of 2337 residents aged 18 years and over in a diverse set of New Zealand communities. Data were collected via a self-administered pen-and-paper questionnaire.

Results: There were responses from 1372 individuals (response: 59%). Problem drinking amongst youth (<25 years of age) was considered the leading problem by the majority of respondents in six of seven areas. Alcohol was considered to play a major role in incidents of violence, vandalism, dangerous driving and traffic crashes. Fifty-eight percent of respondents agreed that "it is up to local government to make sure alcohol does not become a problem in the community". There was strong support for local governments to restrict the hours of operation of on-licenced premises, to use liquor bans to control drinking in public places, and for local governments and police to be stricter in their enforcement of drinking laws.

Conclusion: There is strong support for local government alcohol policies that restrict the availability and promotion of alcohol. The study findings are important in light of the stated purpose of local government in New Zealand and the recently completed "once in a generation" review of alcohol laws and policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 23, no 1, 45-53 p.
Keyword [en]
Alcohol, Public sentiment, Policy, Controls, Local government
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-70216DOI: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2011.05.019ISI: 000298454900014PubMedID: 21742480OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-70216DiVA: diva2:479869
Available from: 2012-01-18 Created: 2012-01-18 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Room, Robin
In the same journal
International journal on drug policy
Social Work

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 27 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf